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Swords of Honor: The Revival of Orthodox Christianity in Twentieth-Century Britain

Swords of Honor: The Revival of Orthodox Christianity in Twentieth-Century Britain Adam Schwartz Literary Converts: Spiritual Inspiration in an Age of Unbelief by Joseph Pearce San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2000 xii + 452 pp.; $24.95 Upon learning in 1928 of T. S. Eliot's conversion to Christianity, Virginia Woolf wrote to her sister: I have had a most shameful and distressing interview with poor dear Tom Eliot, who may be called dead to us all from this day forward. He has become an Anglo-Catholic, believes in God and immortality, and goes to church. I was really shocked. A corpse would seem to me more credible than he is. I mean, there's something obscene in a living person sitting by the fire and believing in God.1 Woolf's dismissal of belief in traditional Christianity as a distressing obscenity was typical of British intellectuals' attitudes during her era. From G. B. Shaw to H. G. Wells, from Bertrand Russell to 4:1 winter 2001 Arnold Bennett, a common supposition among the day's cultural leaders was that dogmatic religion was so much shameful hidebound superstition that people must be liberated from for the sake of their own well-being and society's progress. Although such sentiments had been growing steadily among the British literati throughout the nineteenth http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture Logos: Journal of Catholic Thought & Culture

Swords of Honor: The Revival of Orthodox Christianity in Twentieth-Century Britain

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Publisher
Logos: Journal of Catholic Thought & Culture
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 The University of St. Thomas.
ISSN
1533-791X
Publisher site
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Abstract

Adam Schwartz Literary Converts: Spiritual Inspiration in an Age of Unbelief by Joseph Pearce San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2000 xii + 452 pp.; $24.95 Upon learning in 1928 of T. S. Eliot's conversion to Christianity, Virginia Woolf wrote to her sister: I have had a most shameful and distressing interview with poor dear Tom Eliot, who may be called dead to us all from this day forward. He has become an Anglo-Catholic, believes in God and immortality, and goes to church. I was really shocked. A corpse would seem to me more credible than he is. I mean, there's something obscene in a living person sitting by the fire and believing in God.1 Woolf's dismissal of belief in traditional Christianity as a distressing obscenity was typical of British intellectuals' attitudes during her era. From G. B. Shaw to H. G. Wells, from Bertrand Russell to 4:1 winter 2001 Arnold Bennett, a common supposition among the day's cultural leaders was that dogmatic religion was so much shameful hidebound superstition that people must be liberated from for the sake of their own well-being and society's progress. Although such sentiments had been growing steadily among the British literati throughout the nineteenth

Journal

Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and CultureLogos: Journal of Catholic Thought & Culture

Published: Feb 1, 2001

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