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Virtual networking: Reflections on the status of ATM

Virtual networking: Reflections on the status of ATM Journal of High Speed Networks 6 (1997) 215-219 IOS Press Scott Bradner Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA E-mail.' sob@harvard.edu 1. Introduction ATM was once regarded as the future of networking, data and otherwise, but the picture seems far less clear now. It was only two or three years ago that almost all of the professional pundits, many people in corporate management and not a few people who actually managed networks were looking at ATM as if it were some form of grand unifying technology of networking. It was seen as the one networking technology that was able to span the netscape from desktop connections to transcontinental high-speed wide area links, and from campus backbones to ADSL links to the home. ATM was touted as being able to support multimedia (even if, at best, there seemed to be a foggy definition of multimedia) and quality of service (QoS). Applications from interactive voice and video to bulk data transfer could be simultaneously supported without interfering with each other. ATM was also seen as the scaleable networking technology, able to span the range from low speed phone lines to multi-gigabit data paths, 'from DC to light' as one pundit put http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of High Speed Networks iospress

Virtual networking: Reflections on the status of ATM

Journal of High Speed Networks , Volume 6 (3) – Jan 1, 1997

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Publisher
IOS Press
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by IOS Press, Inc
ISSN
0926-6801
eISSN
1875-8940
DOI
10.3233/JHS-1997-6305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of High Speed Networks 6 (1997) 215-219 IOS Press Scott Bradner Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA E-mail.' sob@harvard.edu 1. Introduction ATM was once regarded as the future of networking, data and otherwise, but the picture seems far less clear now. It was only two or three years ago that almost all of the professional pundits, many people in corporate management and not a few people who actually managed networks were looking at ATM as if it were some form of grand unifying technology of networking. It was seen as the one networking technology that was able to span the netscape from desktop connections to transcontinental high-speed wide area links, and from campus backbones to ADSL links to the home. ATM was touted as being able to support multimedia (even if, at best, there seemed to be a foggy definition of multimedia) and quality of service (QoS). Applications from interactive voice and video to bulk data transfer could be simultaneously supported without interfering with each other. ATM was also seen as the scaleable networking technology, able to span the range from low speed phone lines to multi-gigabit data paths, 'from DC to light' as one pundit put

Journal

Journal of High Speed Networksiospress

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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