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Rethinking Thailand's Southern Violence (review)

Rethinking Thailand's Southern Violence (review) Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 29, No. 2 (2007), pp. 386­88 DOI: 10.1355/cs29-2k © 2007 ISEAS ISSN 0219-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic Rethinking Thailand's Southern Violence. Edited by Duncan McCargo. Singapore: NUS Press, 2007. Softcover: 225pp. The book is essential reading for anyone interested in contemporary Thai politics. Though all of the seven contributors focus their analysis on the consequences of the upsurge in often indiscriminate violence in Thailand's three southern provinces of Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat, the issues they canvas go further in shedding light on the country's social, religious and political conditions in the first decade of the 21th century. Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the incidence of violent attacks not only between the authorities and local residents but also of intra-Malay Muslim community violence. From 84 such attacks in 2003, the number of incidents rose to 1843 in 2004. During the first six months of 2005, more than 650 persons died in attacks and more than a thousand others were wounded, the majority in both cases Muslims of Malay descent. Thailand's southern Malay minority, long ignored in national politics, has become a major issue. While several of the contributors to this volume http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic Affairs Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

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Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1793-284X
Publisher site
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Abstract

Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 29, No. 2 (2007), pp. 386­88 DOI: 10.1355/cs29-2k © 2007 ISEAS ISSN 0219-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic Rethinking Thailand's Southern Violence. Edited by Duncan McCargo. Singapore: NUS Press, 2007. Softcover: 225pp. The book is essential reading for anyone interested in contemporary Thai politics. Though all of the seven contributors focus their analysis on the consequences of the upsurge in often indiscriminate violence in Thailand's three southern provinces of Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat, the issues they canvas go further in shedding light on the country's social, religious and political conditions in the first decade of the 21th century. Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the incidence of violent attacks not only between the authorities and local residents but also of intra-Malay Muslim community violence. From 84 such attacks in 2003, the number of incidents rose to 1843 in 2004. During the first six months of 2005, more than 650 persons died in attacks and more than a thousand others were wounded, the majority in both cases Muslims of Malay descent. Thailand's southern Malay minority, long ignored in national politics, has become a major issue. While several of the contributors to this volume

Journal

Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic AffairsInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: Sep 27, 2007

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