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Beyond Democracy in Cambodia: Political Reconstruction in a Post-Conflict Society (review)

Beyond Democracy in Cambodia: Political Reconstruction in a Post-Conflict Society (review) Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 33, No. 1 (2011), pp. 151­53 DOI: 10.1355/cs33-1i © 2011 ISEAS ISSN 0129-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic Beyond Democracy in Cambodia: Political Reconstruction in a Post-Conflict Society. Edited by Joakim Öjendal and Mona Lilja. Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2009. Softcover: 320pp. Editors Joakim Öjendal and Mona Lilja have assembled a thoughtprovoking series of essays, each of which casts light on a particular aspect of the weak Cambodian "hybrid" democracy, and offers suggestions on how Cambodia might be made a freer, less unequal and fairer society. The collection includes a knowledgeable chapter by Caroline Hughes on elections and political legitimacy; a cogent essay by Kheang Un on the judiciary and the separation of powers; a piece by Kim Sedara and Öjendal on the potential of local government to spread democracy; an optimistic chapter by Lilja on the effects of globalization on women's participation in politics; and a contribution by John Marston on the role of the Buddhist Sangha in building respect for human rights. Lilja and Öjendal conclude with a chapter on the future directions of what they call "Hybrid Democracy" in Cambodia. The chapters by Khmer scholars are also proof that despite being governed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic Affairs Institute of Southeast Asian Studies

Beyond Democracy in Cambodia: Political Reconstruction in a Post-Conflict Society (review)

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Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
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Copyright © Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
ISSN
1793-284X
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Abstract

Contemporary Southeast Asia Vol. 33, No. 1 (2011), pp. 151­53 DOI: 10.1355/cs33-1i © 2011 ISEAS ISSN 0129-797X print / ISSN 1793-284X electronic Beyond Democracy in Cambodia: Political Reconstruction in a Post-Conflict Society. Edited by Joakim Öjendal and Mona Lilja. Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2009. Softcover: 320pp. Editors Joakim Öjendal and Mona Lilja have assembled a thoughtprovoking series of essays, each of which casts light on a particular aspect of the weak Cambodian "hybrid" democracy, and offers suggestions on how Cambodia might be made a freer, less unequal and fairer society. The collection includes a knowledgeable chapter by Caroline Hughes on elections and political legitimacy; a cogent essay by Kheang Un on the judiciary and the separation of powers; a piece by Kim Sedara and Öjendal on the potential of local government to spread democracy; an optimistic chapter by Lilja on the effects of globalization on women's participation in politics; and a contribution by John Marston on the role of the Buddhist Sangha in building respect for human rights. Lilja and Öjendal conclude with a chapter on the future directions of what they call "Hybrid Democracy" in Cambodia. The chapters by Khmer scholars are also proof that despite being governed

Journal

Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic AffairsInstitute of Southeast Asian Studies

Published: Jun 4, 2011

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