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Graduated response and the emergence of a European surveillance society

Graduated response and the emergence of a European surveillance society Purpose – This paper seeks to offer an alternative critique to graduated response, a warning and sanction mechanism aimed at fighting online piracy. Design/methodology/approach – This paper reflects on and frames graduated response in terms of theories on surveillance society and code. In particular, it analyses the graduated response debate in the European Union and the current initiatives in France and the UK. Findings – The paper argues that graduated response portrays rights holders as being in a state of emergency, is a form of social sorting, and has a technological bias. Originality/value – This paper contends that many objections raised to graduated response have been reduced to issues concerning the procedure rather than the principle, and that important societal questions concerning graduated response remain un(der)explored. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png info Emerald Publishing

Graduated response and the emergence of a European surveillance society

info , Volume 12 (6): 11 – Sep 28, 2010

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1463-6697
DOI
10.1108/14636691011086053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This paper seeks to offer an alternative critique to graduated response, a warning and sanction mechanism aimed at fighting online piracy. Design/methodology/approach – This paper reflects on and frames graduated response in terms of theories on surveillance society and code. In particular, it analyses the graduated response debate in the European Union and the current initiatives in France and the UK. Findings – The paper argues that graduated response portrays rights holders as being in a state of emergency, is a form of social sorting, and has a technological bias. Originality/value – This paper contends that many objections raised to graduated response have been reduced to issues concerning the procedure rather than the principle, and that important societal questions concerning graduated response remain un(der)explored.

Journal

infoEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 28, 2010

Keywords: Internet; Surveillance; Public policy; Property rights

References