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Writing in the Realm of the Senses. Introduction

Writing in the Realm of the Senses. Introduction ii Writing in the Realm of the Sense. Introduction the gender as well as visual politics inscribed in the “money shot” (of an ejaculating penis) typical of many pornographic films. It soon becomes clear, however, that the human sensorium itself stands as a terrain of competing functions, with the result that certain senses, such as sight and hearing, have traditionally enjoyed a kind of hegemony and dictated the representational issues being discussed. This has in turn led to a tendency on the part of scholars to concentrate on those forms and genres that have the most to do with the eyes and the ears. While several of the essays in the present volume do return in fascinating ways to issues of visuality, sight, and blindness (conjured by paintings, prose narratives, and films, as well as personal experience), the rest ask explicitly or implicitly what kinds of theorizations are possible with other types of sensorial events (orgasm, architectural space, train commuting, panic, topophilia, and performance of ideological jouis-sense) that may have been less subject to academic debate but that are nonetheless of comparable significance to the historically evolving configurations of everyday experiences. Each in his or her own imaginative http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies Duke University Press

Writing in the Realm of the Senses. Introduction

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 1999 by Brown University and differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies
ISSN
1040-7391
eISSN
1527-1986
DOI
10.1215/10407391-11-2-i
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ii Writing in the Realm of the Sense. Introduction the gender as well as visual politics inscribed in the “money shot” (of an ejaculating penis) typical of many pornographic films. It soon becomes clear, however, that the human sensorium itself stands as a terrain of competing functions, with the result that certain senses, such as sight and hearing, have traditionally enjoyed a kind of hegemony and dictated the representational issues being discussed. This has in turn led to a tendency on the part of scholars to concentrate on those forms and genres that have the most to do with the eyes and the ears. While several of the essays in the present volume do return in fascinating ways to issues of visuality, sight, and blindness (conjured by paintings, prose narratives, and films, as well as personal experience), the rest ask explicitly or implicitly what kinds of theorizations are possible with other types of sensorial events (orgasm, architectural space, train commuting, panic, topophilia, and performance of ideological jouis-sense) that may have been less subject to academic debate but that are nonetheless of comparable significance to the historically evolving configurations of everyday experiences. Each in his or her own imaginative

Journal

differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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