Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Unrelated Passions

Unrelated Passions things, the prisoner of circumstances he himself has created—and the wholly new threat to mankind’s physical existence posed by nuclear weapons. —Fromm vii–viii The words that Plato puts in his stranger’s mouth are the program of a humanistic society, which embodies itself in a singular, complete humanist, the master of a royal pastoral art. The task of this superhuma nist would be nothing other than designing a plan w ithin and for [bei] an elite, which must be bred expressly on behalf of the whole [Ganzen] [. . .]. But now, after the great revolution [Umwälzung] (metabole), the gods under Zeus’s reign having withdraw n and leaving to man the responsibility for his ow n custody, the wise man stays behind as the worthiest guardian and breeder/educator [Zeuchter], in whom the heavenly vision of absolute good is most alive. Without the guiding image [Leitbild] of the wise, the care and cultivation [Pf lege] of humanity remains a fruitless passion [eine vergebliche Leidenschaft]. —Sloterdijk 54 –55, my translation Copyright 2003 by Brown University and : A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies 14 :1 cliché : perched on an edge of the long trip from Fromm’s edited volume on Socialist http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies Duke University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/unrelated-passions-0Y21aYomFd
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Brown University and differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies
ISSN
1040-7391
eISSN
1527-1986
DOI
10.1215/10407391-14-1-74
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

things, the prisoner of circumstances he himself has created—and the wholly new threat to mankind’s physical existence posed by nuclear weapons. —Fromm vii–viii The words that Plato puts in his stranger’s mouth are the program of a humanistic society, which embodies itself in a singular, complete humanist, the master of a royal pastoral art. The task of this superhuma nist would be nothing other than designing a plan w ithin and for [bei] an elite, which must be bred expressly on behalf of the whole [Ganzen] [. . .]. But now, after the great revolution [Umwälzung] (metabole), the gods under Zeus’s reign having withdraw n and leaving to man the responsibility for his ow n custody, the wise man stays behind as the worthiest guardian and breeder/educator [Zeuchter], in whom the heavenly vision of absolute good is most alive. Without the guiding image [Leitbild] of the wise, the care and cultivation [Pf lege] of humanity remains a fruitless passion [eine vergebliche Leidenschaft]. —Sloterdijk 54 –55, my translation Copyright 2003 by Brown University and : A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies 14 :1 cliché : perched on an edge of the long trip from Fromm’s edited volume on Socialist

Journal

differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.