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Transgender Studies: Queer Theory's Evil Twin

Transgender Studies: Queer Theory's Evil Twin Many of the key debates and conceptual overhauls that have animated lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) studies over the last ten years or so might be broadly described in terms of their common interest in specifying the proper relations between gender and sexuality. If LGBTQ studies initially insisted on a clear distinction between gender and sexuality, that cleavage was subsequently contested by many who objected to the normalizing capacity of any neat quarantining of the cultural work of sexuality and gender. Ensuing discussions of what was at stake in adjudicating the relative independence or imbrication of gender and sexuality gave critical heft to a range of terms such as gender performativity, butch/femme gender, female masculinity, and transgender subjectivities, whose implications are still shaping the direction of sexuality studies. In addition, attention paid to the shifting relations between gender and sexuality has enabled a number of projects that seem more prominently organized under other scholarly rubrics. An abbreviated list might include the historicizing of sexual identities and the concomitant untangling of genealogies of identification and desire, the critical engagements with and swearings off of psychoanalytic models of subjectivity, and the increasingly fine-tuned analyses of the articulations of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies Duke University Press

Transgender Studies: Queer Theory's Evil Twin

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2004 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1064-2684
eISSN
1527-9375
DOI
10.1215/10642684-10-2-212
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many of the key debates and conceptual overhauls that have animated lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) studies over the last ten years or so might be broadly described in terms of their common interest in specifying the proper relations between gender and sexuality. If LGBTQ studies initially insisted on a clear distinction between gender and sexuality, that cleavage was subsequently contested by many who objected to the normalizing capacity of any neat quarantining of the cultural work of sexuality and gender. Ensuing discussions of what was at stake in adjudicating the relative independence or imbrication of gender and sexuality gave critical heft to a range of terms such as gender performativity, butch/femme gender, female masculinity, and transgender subjectivities, whose implications are still shaping the direction of sexuality studies. In addition, attention paid to the shifting relations between gender and sexuality has enabled a number of projects that seem more prominently organized under other scholarly rubrics. An abbreviated list might include the historicizing of sexual identities and the concomitant untangling of genealogies of identification and desire, the critical engagements with and swearings off of psychoanalytic models of subjectivity, and the increasingly fine-tuned analyses of the articulations of

Journal

GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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