Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

State, Class, and Ideology in the Iranian Revolution

State, Class, and Ideology in the Iranian Revolution © Unlessotherwisenoted,alltranslationsaremyown. 1. SaidAmirArjand,“Iran’sIslamicRevolutioninCparative Perspective,”World Politics38(1986):383–414. 2. SaidAmirArjand,“Shi’iteIslamandtheRevolutioninIran,” Government andOpposition16(1981):293–316. 3. MansoorMoaddel,Class, Politics, and Ideology in the Iranian Revolution(NewYork:ColumbiaUniversityPress,1993),24. 4. ThedaSkocpol,“RentierateandShi’aIslamintheIranian Revolution,”Theory and Society11(1982):265–83. C ra pa so S S f , he ri Af M Ea expensive melons, that we sacrificed our young men to have less expensive housing. . . . No one would give his life for better agriculture. Dignity is better than full bellies. Iranian masses have fought only for God not worldly affairs.”5 Many of the analyses of the Iranian revolution are heavily influenced by the revolution’s outce and the rise of a theocratic ate. Se analyses are reductioni and oversimplify the cplexity of the revolutionary ruggles. Other analyses are clearly tautological. They begin with certain outces of the revolution—a large-scale popular uprising again the shah, Kheini’s leadership, the death of proteors at the hands of the military—and then use these very developments as explanations for the revolution. Both genres of explanation largely ignore the cplexity of the revolutionary processes and ruggles. The fact that Iranians formed a broad coalition again the monarchy and overthrew the government does not mean that Iranians lived in urban cmunities that enabled them to mobilize and revolt. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

State, Class, and Ideology in the Iranian Revolution

Loading next page...
 
/lp/duke-university-press/state-class-and-ideology-in-the-iranian-revolution-D026JDD7il
Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2009 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1548-226X
DOI
10.1215/1089201X-2008-041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Unlessotherwisenoted,alltranslationsaremyown. 1. SaidAmirArjand,“Iran’sIslamicRevolutioninCparative Perspective,”World Politics38(1986):383–414. 2. SaidAmirArjand,“Shi’iteIslamandtheRevolutioninIran,” Government andOpposition16(1981):293–316. 3. MansoorMoaddel,Class, Politics, and Ideology in the Iranian Revolution(NewYork:ColumbiaUniversityPress,1993),24. 4. ThedaSkocpol,“RentierateandShi’aIslamintheIranian Revolution,”Theory and Society11(1982):265–83. C ra pa so S S f , he ri Af M Ea expensive melons, that we sacrificed our young men to have less expensive housing. . . . No one would give his life for better agriculture. Dignity is better than full bellies. Iranian masses have fought only for God not worldly affairs.”5 Many of the analyses of the Iranian revolution are heavily influenced by the revolution’s outce and the rise of a theocratic ate. Se analyses are reductioni and oversimplify the cplexity of the revolutionary ruggles. Other analyses are clearly tautological. They begin with certain outces of the revolution—a large-scale popular uprising again the shah, Kheini’s leadership, the death of proteors at the hands of the military—and then use these very developments as explanations for the revolution. Both genres of explanation largely ignore the cplexity of the revolutionary processes and ruggles. The fact that Iranians formed a broad coalition again the monarchy and overthrew the government does not mean that Iranians lived in urban cmunities that enabled them to mobilize and revolt.

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2009

There are no references for this article.