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Rethinking Revolutions: Integrating Origins, Processes, and Outcomes

Rethinking Revolutions: Integrating Origins, Processes, and Outcomes     Co So ra pa e  d u ca fri   ies  o f d    A u th  M , A   an   th e ol.    V .N o  29 1 , 2 5/ 121 i ve 1 0.  Un oi  ke   d  D u  b y 09 20  ©  2 1x- - 04 0   e ss   he myth of revolutions treats them as sudden detonations of popular energy and social change. Dramatic acts on a particular day — the fall of the Baille in Paris on 14 July 1789 and the midnight orming of the Winter Palace in . Petersburg (then called Petrograd) on 24 October 1917 — have ce to symbolize the French and Russian revolutions. When mo people think of “revolutions,” they think of a rapid series of events, taking a matter of weeks or months, during which old regimes fall, new regimes are conructed, and the population accepts (or is forced to accept) the new order. udies of revolution have also tended to focus on the “explosive” ments of revolution and to dwell mainly on the conditions that led to such explosions.1 This emphasis has led to the “ate-centered” theories of revolution, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East Duke University Press

Rethinking Revolutions: Integrating Origins, Processes, and Outcomes

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2009 by Duke University Press
ISSN
1089-201X
eISSN
1548-226X
DOI
10.1215/1089201X-2008-040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

    Co So ra pa e  d u ca fri   ies  o f d    A u th  M , A   an   th e ol.    V .N o  29 1 , 2 5/ 121 i ve 1 0.  Un oi  ke   d  D u  b y 09 20  ©  2 1x- - 04 0   e ss   he myth of revolutions treats them as sudden detonations of popular energy and social change. Dramatic acts on a particular day — the fall of the Baille in Paris on 14 July 1789 and the midnight orming of the Winter Palace in . Petersburg (then called Petrograd) on 24 October 1917 — have ce to symbolize the French and Russian revolutions. When mo people think of “revolutions,” they think of a rapid series of events, taking a matter of weeks or months, during which old regimes fall, new regimes are conructed, and the population accepts (or is forced to accept) the new order. udies of revolution have also tended to focus on the “explosive” ments of revolution and to dwell mainly on the conditions that led to such explosions.1 This emphasis has led to the “ate-centered” theories of revolution,

Journal

Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle EastDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2009

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