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Orphaned, Adopted, and Abducted: Parents and Children in Twentieth-Century America

Orphaned, Adopted, and Abducted: Parents and Children in Twentieth-Century America Page 174 (RE)VIEWS Shafali Lal Julie Berebitsky, Like Our Very Own: Adoption and the Changing Culture of Motherhood, 1851–1950. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2000. Paula S. Fass, Kidnapped: Child Abduction in America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. Linda Gordon, The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1999. fter September 11, 2001, very few parents will recall last spring’s top news story concerning six-year-old Elian Gonzalez. Most parents, however, will still send their children off to school with warnings regarding strangers, kidnappers, or sexual predators. Historians looking back on the turning of the twentieth century will link all of these events—commonplace and unusual, local and global—into one portrait revelatory of our society’s valuation of children and the multiple meanings Americans attached to kith and kin. That extended relatives, federal officials, the president of the United States, and even the Supreme Court ultimately played a role in determining young Elian’s home did seem extraordinary last year, yet it would not have surprised Issue 84 (fall 2002): 174–84 Copyright 2002 by MARHO: The Radical Historians’ Organization, Inc. 14-RHR 84 Lal.btw 9/12/02 2:36 PM Page 175 the residents of Clifton-Morenci, Arizona, one hundred years ago. As historian Linda http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Radical History Review Duke University Press

Orphaned, Adopted, and Abducted: Parents and Children in Twentieth-Century America

Radical History Review , Volume 2002 (84) – Oct 1, 2002

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by MARHO: The Radical Historians' Organization, Inc.
ISSN
0163-6545
eISSN
1534-1453
DOI
10.1215/01636545-2002-84-174
Publisher site
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Abstract

Page 174 (RE)VIEWS Shafali Lal Julie Berebitsky, Like Our Very Own: Adoption and the Changing Culture of Motherhood, 1851–1950. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2000. Paula S. Fass, Kidnapped: Child Abduction in America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. Linda Gordon, The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1999. fter September 11, 2001, very few parents will recall last spring’s top news story concerning six-year-old Elian Gonzalez. Most parents, however, will still send their children off to school with warnings regarding strangers, kidnappers, or sexual predators. Historians looking back on the turning of the twentieth century will link all of these events—commonplace and unusual, local and global—into one portrait revelatory of our society’s valuation of children and the multiple meanings Americans attached to kith and kin. That extended relatives, federal officials, the president of the United States, and even the Supreme Court ultimately played a role in determining young Elian’s home did seem extraordinary last year, yet it would not have surprised Issue 84 (fall 2002): 174–84 Copyright 2002 by MARHO: The Radical Historians’ Organization, Inc. 14-RHR 84 Lal.btw 9/12/02 2:36 PM Page 175 the residents of Clifton-Morenci, Arizona, one hundred years ago. As historian Linda

Journal

Radical History ReviewDuke University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2002

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