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Fighting "Humanism" on Its Own Terms

Fighting "Humanism" on Its Own Terms Copyright 2003 by Brown University and d i f f e r e n c e s : A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies 14 :1 a puppy a beggar ( Notebook 43) 1 Lists such as this abound in Notebook of a Return to the Native Land and in Césaire’s later poetry as well: images in varying degrees of disparity are joined rhythmically, if not always logically, by the repetition of particular words within the sequence. But this list stands out not just because the logic uniting the terms appears more transparent than it often does in Césaire’s lyric poetry. What seem incongruent are the speaker’s elaboration throughout the Notebook of the idea of negritude (its Martinican particularities and its global reach) and his sense of identification with the disempowered generally, even those whose ancestr y and historical experience put them outside negritude’s scope. At the same time, Césaire’s formulations and defenses of negritude tend to contain within them similarly conjoined appeals to black solidarity and human community, as when he writes: [. . .] entrenched as I am in this unique race you still know my tyrannical love you know that it is not from hatred http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies Duke University Press

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2003 by Brown University and differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies
ISSN
1040-7391
eISSN
1527-1986
DOI
10.1215/10407391-14-1-53
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Copyright 2003 by Brown University and d i f f e r e n c e s : A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies 14 :1 a puppy a beggar ( Notebook 43) 1 Lists such as this abound in Notebook of a Return to the Native Land and in Césaire’s later poetry as well: images in varying degrees of disparity are joined rhythmically, if not always logically, by the repetition of particular words within the sequence. But this list stands out not just because the logic uniting the terms appears more transparent than it often does in Césaire’s lyric poetry. What seem incongruent are the speaker’s elaboration throughout the Notebook of the idea of negritude (its Martinican particularities and its global reach) and his sense of identification with the disempowered generally, even those whose ancestr y and historical experience put them outside negritude’s scope. At the same time, Césaire’s formulations and defenses of negritude tend to contain within them similarly conjoined appeals to black solidarity and human community, as when he writes: [. . .] entrenched as I am in this unique race you still know my tyrannical love you know that it is not from hatred

Journal

differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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