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Failures of Domestication: Speculations on Globality, Economy, and the Sex of Excess in Thailand

Failures of Domestication: Speculations on Globality, Economy, and the Sex of Excess in Thailand Failures of Domestication for itself. Such doubleness concealed what it presumed, namely, that the goal of all historical development had itself become both unified and singular: an abstractly homogenized global space subject to one economic law, in which the presumption of equality would allow for the exercise of differential authority. Francis Fukuyama’s euphoric proclamations of conservative victory assumed nearly axiomatic status even among those who were seeking destinations other than the terminus of history. Some of the most powerful indices of this transformation can be found in the shifting lexicons of political-economic commentary. In this context, it is important to note that wherever the language of corruption and contagion came to dominate political discourse, it construed inequality and economic crisis in terms of failure. Indeed, in the millennial moment, “failure” came to displace “class” and “structural contradiction” as the orienting term of debate. Like “corruption” or “contagion,” failure suggests the existence of a normative ideal that can be recognized and in relation to which acts can be adjudicated. But insofar as economic failure is typically read as the function of corruption and also as the origin of contagion, it suggests something else, namely that certain kinds of mobility http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies Duke University Press

Failures of Domestication: Speculations on Globality, Economy, and the Sex of Excess in Thailand

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Publisher
Duke University Press
Copyright
Copyright 2002 by Brown University and differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies
ISSN
1040-7391
eISSN
1527-1986
DOI
10.1215/10407391-13-1-45
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Failures of Domestication for itself. Such doubleness concealed what it presumed, namely, that the goal of all historical development had itself become both unified and singular: an abstractly homogenized global space subject to one economic law, in which the presumption of equality would allow for the exercise of differential authority. Francis Fukuyama’s euphoric proclamations of conservative victory assumed nearly axiomatic status even among those who were seeking destinations other than the terminus of history. Some of the most powerful indices of this transformation can be found in the shifting lexicons of political-economic commentary. In this context, it is important to note that wherever the language of corruption and contagion came to dominate political discourse, it construed inequality and economic crisis in terms of failure. Indeed, in the millennial moment, “failure” came to displace “class” and “structural contradiction” as the orienting term of debate. Like “corruption” or “contagion,” failure suggests the existence of a normative ideal that can be recognized and in relation to which acts can be adjudicated. But insofar as economic failure is typically read as the function of corruption and also as the origin of contagion, it suggests something else, namely that certain kinds of mobility

Journal

differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural StudiesDuke University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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