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The Logic of Opportunity: Philip II, Demosthenes, and the Charismatic Imagination

The Logic of Opportunity: Philip II, Demosthenes, and the Charismatic Imagination Abstract: Demosthenes' characterization of Philip II of Macedon as a charismatic leader and talented opportunist has framed the historical narrative of the fourth century BCE in terms of what Philip did right and the Greek poleis did wrong. An analysis of Philip's early campaigns, drawing on sociological approaches to the study of opportunity, suggests that his "charismatic imagination" was his open-ended, high-risk, and relentless pursuit of new opportunities for growth. Examination of the opportunities open to the Athenians and the Macedonians helps reframe the debate in terms of the overarching constraints affecting the strategic decisions of both states. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Syllecta Classica Department of Classics @ the University of Iowa

The Logic of Opportunity: Philip II, Demosthenes, and the Charismatic Imagination

Syllecta Classica , Volume 21 (1) – May 27, 2011

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Publisher
Department of Classics @ the University of Iowa
Copyright
Copyright © Department of Classics @ the University of Iowa
ISSN
2160-5157
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Abstract

Abstract: Demosthenes' characterization of Philip II of Macedon as a charismatic leader and talented opportunist has framed the historical narrative of the fourth century BCE in terms of what Philip did right and the Greek poleis did wrong. An analysis of Philip's early campaigns, drawing on sociological approaches to the study of opportunity, suggests that his "charismatic imagination" was his open-ended, high-risk, and relentless pursuit of new opportunities for growth. Examination of the opportunities open to the Athenians and the Macedonians helps reframe the debate in terms of the overarching constraints affecting the strategic decisions of both states.

Journal

Syllecta ClassicaDepartment of Classics @ the University of Iowa

Published: May 27, 2011

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