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The Caged Bird In Roman Life And Poetry; Metaphor, Cognition, And Value

The Caged Bird In Roman Life And Poetry; Metaphor, Cognition, And Value Abstract: This paper considers the domestic caged bird as a cultural artefact in Rome, identifying it as a specifically Roman phenomenon related to Roman habits of acquisition, collection, and display. It further considers the aesthetic aspects of the caged bird and how it impacted on social and mental space both directly and through the media of painting and literature. In this respect the caged bird is considered in relation to accessible metaphoric readings and to the physical and cognitive patterns of the house. Finally, the relationship of the caged bird to art and fashion is considered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Syllecta Classica Department of Classics @ the University of Iowa

The Caged Bird In Roman Life And Poetry; Metaphor, Cognition, And Value

Syllecta Classica , Volume 24 – May 17, 2013

The Caged Bird In Roman Life And Poetry; Metaphor, Cognition, And Value


: 105­123 THE CAGED BIRD IN ROMAN LIFE AND POETRY; METAPHOR, COGNITION, AND VALUE. Frederick M. A. Jones Abstract: This paper considers the domestic caged bird as a cultural artefact in Rome, identifying it as a specifically Roman phenomenon related to Roman habits of acquisition, collection, and display. It further considers the aesthetic aspects of the caged bird and how it impacted on social and mental space both directly and through the media of painting and literature. In this respect the caged bird is considered in relation to accessible metaphoric readings and to the physical and cognitive patterns of the house. Finally, the relationship of the caged bird to art and fashion is considered.* From the time of the late Republic there was a steep growth in the habit of collection and display among the Roman aristocracy (Beard 2008; Rutledge 2012). Military spoils and the proceeds of provinces fed luxury goods, crafted items, and artworks into Rome, and generated local production. The kinds of things that are collected and displayed ramify. Not only do we hear of Vedius' collection of glassware (Sen. de Ira 3.40), but also of the seemingly more outlandish collection and display of the bones of huge sea monsters and the weapons of the heroes collected by Augustus (Suet. Aug. 72), and curiosities such as Nero's water organ (Suet. Nero 42.1; cf. Dio 63.26.4).1 The domus and villa themselves * Versions of this paper were read at the London Latin Seminar, 11 February 2013 and at the Text and Topos Colloquium at Ertegun House, Oxford, 3 May 2013; I am grateful to all those present for questions and comments, and to Dr P.W. Freeman for comments on an earlier draft. See Townend (1973, 155­6; cf. also Ps.-Acro on Hor. Sat. 2.2.47; Dio 67.9 (Domitian); 59.5.5 (Caligula); SHA Heliogab. 11.2­5; although Juvenal's satiric account of Domitian's huge fish (Juv. 4) foregrounds the issue of its role as something to be eaten, Townend is surely...
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Department of Classics @ the University of Iowa
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Copyright © The University of Iowa
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2160-5157
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Abstract

Abstract: This paper considers the domestic caged bird as a cultural artefact in Rome, identifying it as a specifically Roman phenomenon related to Roman habits of acquisition, collection, and display. It further considers the aesthetic aspects of the caged bird and how it impacted on social and mental space both directly and through the media of painting and literature. In this respect the caged bird is considered in relation to accessible metaphoric readings and to the physical and cognitive patterns of the house. Finally, the relationship of the caged bird to art and fashion is considered.

Journal

Syllecta ClassicaDepartment of Classics @ the University of Iowa

Published: May 17, 2013

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