Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Lure of the Basilisk. Chopin’s Music in the Writings of Thomas Mann, John Galsworthy and Hermann Hesse

The Lure of the Basilisk. Chopin’s Music in the Writings of Thomas Mann, John Galsworthy and... CAROL WOOTTON The Lure of the Basilisk Chopin's Music in the Writings of Thomas Mann, John Galsworthy and Hermann Hesse When Robert Sdiumann äs music critic saw basilisk eyes in Chopin's notes äs they appeared on the printed page1, he was perhaps foreshadowing a trend in the way in whidi writers of the late XIXth Century were influenced by Chopin's music. At first, the impact of Wagner's music tended to overshadow that of his less flamboyant predecessor; nevertheless, the music of Chopin was producing its own impact, psychologically, on a group of writers whose early Output reflected the mood of the fin-de-siecle in Europe. Their selection of the Chopin repertoire tuned to one predominant mood, namely its langour, melancholy and ceaseless yearning, mirrored the growing disintegration of a culture whose over-refinement was lapsing into decadence. Thus basilisk, with its overtones both magical and ominous, suggests the symbol for the growing wave of aestheticism with which the cult of Chopin came to be associated. In literature the expression of the Chopin cult found its way into the early writings of Thomas Mann, Hermann Hesse, and eventually John Galsworthy. Later, äs the twentieth Century progressed and the pendulum swung in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arcadia - Internationale Zeitschrift für Literaturwissenschaft / International Journal for Literary Studies de Gruyter

The Lure of the Basilisk. Chopin’s Music in the Writings of Thomas Mann, John Galsworthy and Hermann Hesse

Loading next page...
 
/lp/de-gruyter/the-lure-of-the-basilisk-chopin-s-music-in-the-writings-of-thomas-mann-ZalWMpX5Um
Publisher
de Gruyter
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Walter de Gruyter
ISSN
0003-7982
eISSN
1613-0642
DOI
10.1515/arca.1974.9.1-3.23
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CAROL WOOTTON The Lure of the Basilisk Chopin's Music in the Writings of Thomas Mann, John Galsworthy and Hermann Hesse When Robert Sdiumann äs music critic saw basilisk eyes in Chopin's notes äs they appeared on the printed page1, he was perhaps foreshadowing a trend in the way in whidi writers of the late XIXth Century were influenced by Chopin's music. At first, the impact of Wagner's music tended to overshadow that of his less flamboyant predecessor; nevertheless, the music of Chopin was producing its own impact, psychologically, on a group of writers whose early Output reflected the mood of the fin-de-siecle in Europe. Their selection of the Chopin repertoire tuned to one predominant mood, namely its langour, melancholy and ceaseless yearning, mirrored the growing disintegration of a culture whose over-refinement was lapsing into decadence. Thus basilisk, with its overtones both magical and ominous, suggests the symbol for the growing wave of aestheticism with which the cult of Chopin came to be associated. In literature the expression of the Chopin cult found its way into the early writings of Thomas Mann, Hermann Hesse, and eventually John Galsworthy. Later, äs the twentieth Century progressed and the pendulum swung in

Journal

Arcadia - Internationale Zeitschrift für Literaturwissenschaft / International Journal for Literary Studiesde Gruyter

Published: Jan 1, 1974

There are no references for this article.