Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

What Other Americans Can and Cannot Learn from Native American Environmental Ethics

What Other Americans Can and Cannot Learn from Native American Environmental Ethics <jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Since the 1960s, many have sought the solutions to North America's ecological crisis in the environmental teachings of Native American peoples. However, for the most part, Native American environmental values have not been investigated in light of the cultural contexts within which they arose. This paper draws on previously published ethnographic work among the Koyukon of interior Alaska and the Hopi of the desert Southwest to elucidate the specific environmental ethics that these two peoples have developed. Based on this contextualized evidence, augmented with teachings from the environmental ethics of other Native American peoples, I then discuss what other Americans can and cannot learn from Native American environmental ethics. Finally, I suggest alternate sources upon which non-indigenous Americans might draw to develop their own traditions of caring about and for the lands they now share with Native peoples.</jats:p> </jats:sec> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Worldviews Brill

What Other Americans Can and Cannot Learn from Native American Environmental Ethics

Worldviews , Volume 15 (3): 219 – Jan 1, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/what-other-americans-can-and-cannot-learn-from-native-american-h0qxh3CUT0
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2011 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1363-5247
eISSN
1568-5357
DOI
10.1163/156853511X588635
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Since the 1960s, many have sought the solutions to North America's ecological crisis in the environmental teachings of Native American peoples. However, for the most part, Native American environmental values have not been investigated in light of the cultural contexts within which they arose. This paper draws on previously published ethnographic work among the Koyukon of interior Alaska and the Hopi of the desert Southwest to elucidate the specific environmental ethics that these two peoples have developed. Based on this contextualized evidence, augmented with teachings from the environmental ethics of other Native American peoples, I then discuss what other Americans can and cannot learn from Native American environmental ethics. Finally, I suggest alternate sources upon which non-indigenous Americans might draw to develop their own traditions of caring about and for the lands they now share with Native peoples.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Journal

WorldviewsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

Keywords: AGRICULTURE; NATIVE AMERICAN RELIGIONS; HOPI; HUNTING; KOYUKON; ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS; HUMAN-ANIMAL RELATIONS; NATURE SPIRITUALITY

There are no references for this article.