Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Colonial Whips, Royal Writs and the Quaker Challenge: Elizabeth Hooton's Voyages through New England in the Seventeenth Century

Colonial Whips, Royal Writs and the Quaker Challenge: Elizabeth Hooton's Voyages through New... Susanna Calkins Department of History, Lake Forest College, Lake Forest, USA n 1662, Quaker Elizabeth Hooton (c. 1600–1671) strode into the Massachusetts Bay Colony, disregarding the Puritan commonwealth’s repressive legislation against the Society of Friends. Inspired by a prophetic missionary impulse to cross the Atlantic, Hooton ostensibly sought to warn the people and the authorities of Boston that God’s judgment was upon them and to persuade them to find the light of Christ within themselves. This was not her first journey to Boston; indeed, she had been driven from the heart of New England’s Puritan stronghold a year earlier for publicly preaching and for trespassing within the colony. On this second occasion, when colonial authorities detained her demanding to know why she again dared to defy the ban against Quakers and risk the pain of public whipping and other punishments, she produced a royal missive from King Charles II. This letter proclaimed her right to purchase land and settle in any British colony she chose, including that godly city on the hill, Boston, and to continue her religious mission unmolested. Rather than honoring the terms of the royal permit, the colonial authorities instead enacted their own authority, publicly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journeys Berghahn Books

Colonial Whips, Royal Writs and the Quaker Challenge: Elizabeth Hooton's Voyages through New England in the Seventeenth Century

Journeys , Volume 5 (2) – Dec 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/berghahn-books/colonial-whips-royal-writs-and-the-quaker-challenge-elizabeth-hooton-s-DRgz3TRvDR
Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© Berghahn Books
ISSN
1465-2609
eISSN
1752-2358
DOI
10.3167/jys.2004.050204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Susanna Calkins Department of History, Lake Forest College, Lake Forest, USA n 1662, Quaker Elizabeth Hooton (c. 1600–1671) strode into the Massachusetts Bay Colony, disregarding the Puritan commonwealth’s repressive legislation against the Society of Friends. Inspired by a prophetic missionary impulse to cross the Atlantic, Hooton ostensibly sought to warn the people and the authorities of Boston that God’s judgment was upon them and to persuade them to find the light of Christ within themselves. This was not her first journey to Boston; indeed, she had been driven from the heart of New England’s Puritan stronghold a year earlier for publicly preaching and for trespassing within the colony. On this second occasion, when colonial authorities detained her demanding to know why she again dared to defy the ban against Quakers and risk the pain of public whipping and other punishments, she produced a royal missive from King Charles II. This letter proclaimed her right to purchase land and settle in any British colony she chose, including that godly city on the hill, Boston, and to continue her religious mission unmolested. Rather than honoring the terms of the royal permit, the colonial authorities instead enacted their own authority, publicly

Journal

JourneysBerghahn Books

Published: Dec 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.