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The Films of Bess Lomax Hawes (review)

The Films of Bess Lomax Hawes (review) FILM REVIEW The Films of Bess Lomax Hawes. 2003. By Bess Lomax Hawes. 58 min., plus extras. DVD format, black and white. (Media-Generation, West Hills, Calif.) Elizabeth Adams California State University, Northridge I am too young to have traveled around the country looking for the kinds of American folk traditions that the Lomax family began to document in the early part of the twentieth century. Do not feel sorry for me, though; I like being part of the TiVo generation. I am also deeply grateful that John and Noah Bishop, Bess Lomax Hawes's son-in-law and grandson, worked with her to remaster the excellent films she made in the 1960s and 1970s. Here is where the great Lomax legacy and the digital age converge and harmonize. No collection of folklore films should be without this excellent DVD compilation. The films themselves vary in their approach. The one that I knew best before this collection was released was Pizza Pizza Daddy-O, which Hawes filmed at a mostly African American elementary school in Los Angeles in the late 1960s. Hawes's approach in Pizza Pizza contrasts sharply with her approach in the other films in the collection through its use of voiceover http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Folklore American Folklore Society

The Films of Bess Lomax Hawes (review)

Journal of American Folklore , Volume 120 (476) – Apr 6, 2007

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Publisher
American Folklore Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1535-1882
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

FILM REVIEW The Films of Bess Lomax Hawes. 2003. By Bess Lomax Hawes. 58 min., plus extras. DVD format, black and white. (Media-Generation, West Hills, Calif.) Elizabeth Adams California State University, Northridge I am too young to have traveled around the country looking for the kinds of American folk traditions that the Lomax family began to document in the early part of the twentieth century. Do not feel sorry for me, though; I like being part of the TiVo generation. I am also deeply grateful that John and Noah Bishop, Bess Lomax Hawes's son-in-law and grandson, worked with her to remaster the excellent films she made in the 1960s and 1970s. Here is where the great Lomax legacy and the digital age converge and harmonize. No collection of folklore films should be without this excellent DVD compilation. The films themselves vary in their approach. The one that I knew best before this collection was released was Pizza Pizza Daddy-O, which Hawes filmed at a mostly African American elementary school in Los Angeles in the late 1960s. Hawes's approach in Pizza Pizza contrasts sharply with her approach in the other films in the collection through its use of voiceover

Journal

Journal of American FolkloreAmerican Folklore Society

Published: Apr 6, 2007

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