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The Cultural Thread: 130 Years of Embroidery and Lace in New Jersey (review)

The Cultural Thread: 130 Years of Embroidery and Lace in New Jersey (review) Exhibit Reviews Despite such challenges, some presenters were able to engage the "Melting Pot" chefs in culturally centered conversations. Some chefs either naturally included or let their narratives be guided toward stories of their personal history with food and cooking. Roberto Donna, chef at the Washington, DC, restaurant Galileo, told sweet stories of growing up above his family's restaurant in Italy, and Paul Prudhomme, one of the first national celebrity chefs, talked about his family's traditional foodways in central and coastal Louisiana. Two of the rare home cooks in the program, Gilroy and Sally Chow of Mississippi, positioned their Chinese Delta fusion cooking within generations of family heritage. Korean cookbook author Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall of Maryland paid homage to her family's lineage of female cooks. These few examples stood in contrast to the other participants who did not identify as being part of a heritage tradition. Many presented themselves as creative individuals on the cutting edge of American cuisine, working against certain food traditions. As exciting and desirable as those changes might be (who can argue against improving the food in our children's schools?), this positioning against tradition shifted the program's direction away from folk culture. If http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Folklore American Folklore Society

The Cultural Thread: 130 Years of Embroidery and Lace in New Jersey (review)

Journal of American Folklore , Volume 120 (476) – Apr 6, 2007

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Publisher
American Folklore Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1535-1882
Publisher site
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Abstract

Exhibit Reviews Despite such challenges, some presenters were able to engage the "Melting Pot" chefs in culturally centered conversations. Some chefs either naturally included or let their narratives be guided toward stories of their personal history with food and cooking. Roberto Donna, chef at the Washington, DC, restaurant Galileo, told sweet stories of growing up above his family's restaurant in Italy, and Paul Prudhomme, one of the first national celebrity chefs, talked about his family's traditional foodways in central and coastal Louisiana. Two of the rare home cooks in the program, Gilroy and Sally Chow of Mississippi, positioned their Chinese Delta fusion cooking within generations of family heritage. Korean cookbook author Hi Soo Shin Hepinstall of Maryland paid homage to her family's lineage of female cooks. These few examples stood in contrast to the other participants who did not identify as being part of a heritage tradition. Many presented themselves as creative individuals on the cutting edge of American cuisine, working against certain food traditions. As exciting and desirable as those changes might be (who can argue against improving the food in our children's schools?), this positioning against tradition shifted the program's direction away from folk culture. If

Journal

Journal of American FolkloreAmerican Folklore Society

Published: Apr 6, 2007

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