Urgent Care Transfers to an Academic Pediatric Emergency Department

Urgent Care Transfers to an Academic Pediatric Emergency Department Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that a significant percentage of urgent care center to pediatric ED transfers can be discharged home without emergency department (ED) resource utilization. Methods A retrospective chart review was completed for a 6-month period on all patients transferred from urgent care centers. A data collection tool focusing on demographics, diagnoses, reason for transfer, ED resource utilization, ED disposition, and 72-hour ED return was used. Each encounter was classified as “urgent” or “nonurgent” based on resource utilization criteria. Descriptive statistics were reported for demographics, encounter data, and 72-hour ED return stratified by nonurgent versus urgent classification. Two-sample t, χ2, and Fisher exact tests were used to assess differences in characteristics between the nonurgent and urgent groups. Results One hundred nine patients met inclusion criteria. Of these, 93 (85%) were discharged from the ED. Twenty nine (27%) of the transferred patients were discharged without ED resource utilization. Seventy-two–hour return was noted for only 1 patient who was again discharged at the subsequent encounter. Conclusions A large proportion of patients transferred from urgent care centers were directly discharged from the ED without any ED resource utilization. Eliminating or reducing such transfers has the potential to limit the amount of nonurgent ED visits, thus producing cost savings and better patient care. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Emergency Care Wolters Kluwer Health

Urgent Care Transfers to an Academic Pediatric Emergency Department

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0749-5161
eISSN
1535-1815
D.O.I.
10.1097/PEC.0000000000001297
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that a significant percentage of urgent care center to pediatric ED transfers can be discharged home without emergency department (ED) resource utilization. Methods A retrospective chart review was completed for a 6-month period on all patients transferred from urgent care centers. A data collection tool focusing on demographics, diagnoses, reason for transfer, ED resource utilization, ED disposition, and 72-hour ED return was used. Each encounter was classified as “urgent” or “nonurgent” based on resource utilization criteria. Descriptive statistics were reported for demographics, encounter data, and 72-hour ED return stratified by nonurgent versus urgent classification. Two-sample t, χ2, and Fisher exact tests were used to assess differences in characteristics between the nonurgent and urgent groups. Results One hundred nine patients met inclusion criteria. Of these, 93 (85%) were discharged from the ED. Twenty nine (27%) of the transferred patients were discharged without ED resource utilization. Seventy-two–hour return was noted for only 1 patient who was again discharged at the subsequent encounter. Conclusions A large proportion of patients transferred from urgent care centers were directly discharged from the ED without any ED resource utilization. Eliminating or reducing such transfers has the potential to limit the amount of nonurgent ED visits, thus producing cost savings and better patient care.

Journal

Pediatric Emergency CareWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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