Techniques for Interventional MRI Guidance in Closed-Bore Systems

Techniques for Interventional MRI Guidance in Closed-Bore Systems AbstractEfficient image guidance is the basis for minimally invasive interventions. In comparison with X-ray, computed tomography (CT), or ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the best soft tissue contrast without ionizing radiation and is therefore predestined for procedural control. But MRI is also characterized by spatial constraints, electromagnetic interactions, long imaging times, and resulting workflow issues. Although many technical requirements have been met over the years—most notably magnetic resonance (MR) compatibility of tools, interventional pulse sequences, and powerful processing hardware and software—there is still a large variety of stand-alone devices and systems for specific procedures only.Assistance and navigation techniques are not a prerequisite for MRI-guided interventions but often provide the means for refined targeting, better control, and improved performance, particularly for more complex access routes or less experienced operators. Open MRI systems have long been a preferred interventional platform because of their largely unrestricted access. Current developments focus on cylindrical wide-bore systems instead that will likely become the standard platform for MRI diagnostics.Stereotactic guidance with the table outside the magnet is common and relies on proper registration of the guiding grids or manipulators to the MR images. Instrument tracking, often by optical sensing, can be added to provide the physicians with proper eye-hand coordination during their navigated approach. Only in very short wide-bore systems, needles can be advanced at the extended arm under near real-time imaging. In standard magnets, control and workflow may be improved by remote operation using robotic or manual driving elements.This work highlights a number of devices and techniques for different interventional settings with a focus on percutaneous, interstitial procedures in different organ regions. The goal is to identify technical and procedural elements that might be relevant for interventional guidance in a broader context, independent of the clinical application given here. Key challenges remain the seamless integration into the interventional workflow, safe clinical translation, and proper cost effectiveness. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Topics in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Wolters Kluwer Health

Techniques for Interventional MRI Guidance in Closed-Bore Systems

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wolters_kluwer/techniques-for-interventional-mri-guidance-in-closed-bore-systems-04d0tqYVTQ
Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0899-3459
eISSN
1536-1004
D.O.I.
10.1097/RMR.0000000000000150
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractEfficient image guidance is the basis for minimally invasive interventions. In comparison with X-ray, computed tomography (CT), or ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the best soft tissue contrast without ionizing radiation and is therefore predestined for procedural control. But MRI is also characterized by spatial constraints, electromagnetic interactions, long imaging times, and resulting workflow issues. Although many technical requirements have been met over the years—most notably magnetic resonance (MR) compatibility of tools, interventional pulse sequences, and powerful processing hardware and software—there is still a large variety of stand-alone devices and systems for specific procedures only.Assistance and navigation techniques are not a prerequisite for MRI-guided interventions but often provide the means for refined targeting, better control, and improved performance, particularly for more complex access routes or less experienced operators. Open MRI systems have long been a preferred interventional platform because of their largely unrestricted access. Current developments focus on cylindrical wide-bore systems instead that will likely become the standard platform for MRI diagnostics.Stereotactic guidance with the table outside the magnet is common and relies on proper registration of the guiding grids or manipulators to the MR images. Instrument tracking, often by optical sensing, can be added to provide the physicians with proper eye-hand coordination during their navigated approach. Only in very short wide-bore systems, needles can be advanced at the extended arm under near real-time imaging. In standard magnets, control and workflow may be improved by remote operation using robotic or manual driving elements.This work highlights a number of devices and techniques for different interventional settings with a focus on percutaneous, interstitial procedures in different organ regions. The goal is to identify technical and procedural elements that might be relevant for interventional guidance in a broader context, independent of the clinical application given here. Key challenges remain the seamless integration into the interventional workflow, safe clinical translation, and proper cost effectiveness.

Journal

Topics in Magnetic Resonance ImagingWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off