Symptom Severity and Quality of Life Among Long-term Colorectal Cancer Survivors Compared With Matched Control Subjects: A Population-Based Study

Symptom Severity and Quality of Life Among Long-term Colorectal Cancer Survivors Compared With... BACKGROUND: Data are lacking regarding physical functioning, psychological well-being, and quality of life among colorectal cancer survivors >10 years postdiagnosis. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine self-reported physical functioning, quality of life, and psychological well-being in long-term colorectal cancer survivors compared with age- and sex-matched unaffected control subjects. DESIGN: Participants completed a cross-sectional survey. SETTINGS: The colorectal cancer survivors and unaffected control subjects were recruited from the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry. PATIENTS: A population-based sample of colorectal cancer survivors (N = 296) and their age- and sex-matched unaffected control subjects (N = 255) were included. Survivors were, on average, 15 years postdiagnosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Quality of life was measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General scale, bowel dysfunction with the Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center scale, urinary dysfunction with the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire–Short Form, fatigue with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue scale, and depression with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression scale. RESULTS: In linear mixed-model analyses adjusting for income, education, race, and comorbid medical conditions, survivors reported good emotional, functional, physical, and overall quality of life, comparable to control subjects. Fatigue and urinary functioning did not differ significantly between survivors and control subjects. Survivors reported significantly higher social quality of life and lower depression compared with unaffected control subjects. The only area where survivors reported significantly worse deficits was in bowel dysfunction, but the magnitude of differences was relatively small. LIMITATIONS: Generalizability is limited by moderately low participation rates. Findings are likely biased toward healthy participants. No baseline assessment was available to examine change in outcomes over time. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term colorectal cancer survivors appear to have comparable quality of life and, in some areas, better well-being than their unaffected peers. Bowel dysfunction may continue to be an ongoing issue even 15 years after colorectal cancer diagnosis. Overall quality of life can be expected to be good in this group of older survivors. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A476. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diseases of the Colon & Rectum Wolters Kluwer Health

Symptom Severity and Quality of Life Among Long-term Colorectal Cancer Survivors Compared With Matched Control Subjects: A Population-Based Study

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer
Copyright
© The ASCRS 2018
ISSN
0012-3706
eISSN
1530-0358
D.O.I.
10.1097/DCR.0000000000000972
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Data are lacking regarding physical functioning, psychological well-being, and quality of life among colorectal cancer survivors >10 years postdiagnosis. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine self-reported physical functioning, quality of life, and psychological well-being in long-term colorectal cancer survivors compared with age- and sex-matched unaffected control subjects. DESIGN: Participants completed a cross-sectional survey. SETTINGS: The colorectal cancer survivors and unaffected control subjects were recruited from the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry. PATIENTS: A population-based sample of colorectal cancer survivors (N = 296) and their age- and sex-matched unaffected control subjects (N = 255) were included. Survivors were, on average, 15 years postdiagnosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Quality of life was measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General scale, bowel dysfunction with the Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center scale, urinary dysfunction with the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire–Short Form, fatigue with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue scale, and depression with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies–Depression scale. RESULTS: In linear mixed-model analyses adjusting for income, education, race, and comorbid medical conditions, survivors reported good emotional, functional, physical, and overall quality of life, comparable to control subjects. Fatigue and urinary functioning did not differ significantly between survivors and control subjects. Survivors reported significantly higher social quality of life and lower depression compared with unaffected control subjects. The only area where survivors reported significantly worse deficits was in bowel dysfunction, but the magnitude of differences was relatively small. LIMITATIONS: Generalizability is limited by moderately low participation rates. Findings are likely biased toward healthy participants. No baseline assessment was available to examine change in outcomes over time. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term colorectal cancer survivors appear to have comparable quality of life and, in some areas, better well-being than their unaffected peers. Bowel dysfunction may continue to be an ongoing issue even 15 years after colorectal cancer diagnosis. Overall quality of life can be expected to be good in this group of older survivors. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A476.

Journal

Diseases of the Colon & RectumWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

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