Simulation-Based Education Enhances Patient Safety Behaviors During Central Venous Catheter Placement

Simulation-Based Education Enhances Patient Safety Behaviors During Central Venous Catheter... Objective We describe the effect of simulation-based education on residents' adherence to protocols for and performance of central venous access. Methods Internal medicine and emergency medicine residents underwent a central venous access course that included a lecture, video presentation, readings, and simulation demonstrations presented by faculty. Baseline data were collected before the course was initiated. After a skills session where they rehearsed their ultrasound-guided central venous access skills, residents were evaluated using a procedural checklist and written knowledge exam. Residents also completed questionnaires regarding confidence in performing ultrasound-guided central venous access and opinions about the training course. Results Residents demonstrated significant improvement on the written knowledge exam (P < 0.0001) and Standard Protocol Checklist (P < 0.0001) after the training course. Training improved a number of patient safety elements, including adherence to sterile technique, transparent dressing, discarding sharps, and ordering postprocedure x-rays. However, a number of residents failed to wash their hands, prepare with chlorhexidine, drape the patient using a sterile technique, anesthetize the site, and perform a preprocedure time-out. Significant improvement in procedural skills was also noted for reduction in skin-to-vein time (P < 0.003) as well as a reduction in number of residents who punctured the carotid artery (P < 0.02). Conclusions Simulation-based education significantly improved residents' knowledge and procedural skills along with their confidence. Adherence to the protocol also improved. This study illustrates that simulation-based education can improve patient safety through training and protocols. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Patient Safety Wolters Kluwer Health

Simulation-Based Education Enhances Patient Safety Behaviors During Central Venous Catheter Placement

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Publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1549-8417
eISSN
1549-8425
D.O.I.
10.1097/PTS.0000000000000425
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective We describe the effect of simulation-based education on residents' adherence to protocols for and performance of central venous access. Methods Internal medicine and emergency medicine residents underwent a central venous access course that included a lecture, video presentation, readings, and simulation demonstrations presented by faculty. Baseline data were collected before the course was initiated. After a skills session where they rehearsed their ultrasound-guided central venous access skills, residents were evaluated using a procedural checklist and written knowledge exam. Residents also completed questionnaires regarding confidence in performing ultrasound-guided central venous access and opinions about the training course. Results Residents demonstrated significant improvement on the written knowledge exam (P < 0.0001) and Standard Protocol Checklist (P < 0.0001) after the training course. Training improved a number of patient safety elements, including adherence to sterile technique, transparent dressing, discarding sharps, and ordering postprocedure x-rays. However, a number of residents failed to wash their hands, prepare with chlorhexidine, drape the patient using a sterile technique, anesthetize the site, and perform a preprocedure time-out. Significant improvement in procedural skills was also noted for reduction in skin-to-vein time (P < 0.003) as well as a reduction in number of residents who punctured the carotid artery (P < 0.02). Conclusions Simulation-based education significantly improved residents' knowledge and procedural skills along with their confidence. Adherence to the protocol also improved. This study illustrates that simulation-based education can improve patient safety through training and protocols.

Journal

Journal of Patient SafetyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Apr 1, 2017

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