Sauce for the Goose Versus Sauce for the Gander

Sauce for the Goose Versus Sauce for the Gander Circulation EDITORIAL Sauce for the Goose Versus Sauce for the Gander Should Men and Women Play the Same Game But With Different Rules? Articles, see p 771 and p 781 Nanette K. Wenger, MD raditionally, coronary heart disease was considered a problem for men. As a consequence, women were understudied, underdiagnosed, and un- T dertreated, with adverse outcomes. With the advent of representation of women in clinical research studies and the elucidation of gender-based differ- ences in the recognition and management of a spectrum of aspects of coronary heart disease, the favorable outcomes have been stunning. Since 2000, cardio- vascular mortality declined precipitously in women, more so than among their male peers. In 2014, for the first time since 1984, fewer US women than men died of cardiovascular disease. Coronary heart disease in women is characteristically more complex than for men. In addition to the traditional atherosclerotic obstructive disease of the epi- cardial coronary arteries, women have nonobstructive coronary atherosclerosis, microvascular disease, or a combination of these attributes. The extent to which these features determine the clinical presentations and outcomes has not yet been ascertained, but ongoing studies are beginning to fill the knowledge gap and con- tribute to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Circulation Wolters Kluwer Health

Sauce for the Goose Versus Sauce for the Gander

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer
Copyright
© 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.
ISSN
0009-7322
eISSN
1524-4539
D.O.I.
10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.033168
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Circulation EDITORIAL Sauce for the Goose Versus Sauce for the Gander Should Men and Women Play the Same Game But With Different Rules? Articles, see p 771 and p 781 Nanette K. Wenger, MD raditionally, coronary heart disease was considered a problem for men. As a consequence, women were understudied, underdiagnosed, and un- T dertreated, with adverse outcomes. With the advent of representation of women in clinical research studies and the elucidation of gender-based differ- ences in the recognition and management of a spectrum of aspects of coronary heart disease, the favorable outcomes have been stunning. Since 2000, cardio- vascular mortality declined precipitously in women, more so than among their male peers. In 2014, for the first time since 1984, fewer US women than men died of cardiovascular disease. Coronary heart disease in women is characteristically more complex than for men. In addition to the traditional atherosclerotic obstructive disease of the epi- cardial coronary arteries, women have nonobstructive coronary atherosclerosis, microvascular disease, or a combination of these attributes. The extent to which these features determine the clinical presentations and outcomes has not yet been ascertained, but ongoing studies are beginning to fill the knowledge gap and con- tribute to

Journal

CirculationWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Feb 20, 2018

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