Reply to: emergency medicine is about collaboration, not monopolisation

Reply to: emergency medicine is about collaboration, not monopolisation 232 Correspondence A typical example is the emergency management of a operating room. We therefore appreciate the thoughtful patient’s airway. We think that it is more important that it comments from Wilhelms et al. In the Scandinavian is managed competently, than who manages it. We would and German speaking countries, care of the critically ill like to see more productive collaboration between the and injured patients, whether in the ICU, the emergen- specialties, in which initiatives such as CREM could cy department (ED) or prehospital, is still very much serve as a common platform for development rather than in the hands of anaesthesiologists. In other parts of a statement of division. We support rotations between Europe, this is different. In addition, we fully agree specialties and common educational activities, such as that most patients in the ED are noncritical with high-fidelity simulation. Rather than eschewing the op- different needs. We think that for such noncritical portunity that lies ahead, we think that the ESA, the patients both the single specialty based and the longi- European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the tudinal emergency care systems may have their European Society for Emergency Medicine should have strengths and weaknesses. It has often been stated that critical roles in this by focusing on joint initiatives that critical care is a concept, not a location. Hence, we fully will benefit to all specialities. support the notion that the European societies for anaesthesiology, emergency medicine and intensive Acknowledgements relating to this article care medicine should work together to develop strong Assistance with the letter: none. and team-based educational and clinical systems to secure optimal care for the critically ill and injured Financial support and sponsorship: none. patient. In this, we think anaesthesiologists, as vital Conflicts of interest: none. function experts, haveamajorroletoplay. References Acknowledgements relating to this article 1 De Robertis E, Bottiger BW, Soreide E, et al. The monopolisation of Assistance with the reply: none. emergency medicine in Europe: the flipside of the medal. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2017; 34:251 – 253. Financial support and sponsorship: none. 2 Gwinnutt CL. The interface between anaesthesia and emergency medicine. Emerg Med J 2001; 18:325 – 329. Conflicts of interest: none. 3 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. The role of the anaesthetist in the emergency service. London: The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland; 1991; Available at: https://www. References aagbi.org/sites/default/files/emergency91.pdf. Accessed 29 November 2017. 1 De Robertis E, Bo ¨ ttiger BW, Søreide E, et al., ESAEBA taskforce on 4 Hoot NR, Aronsky D. Systematic review of emergency department crowding: Critical Emergency Medicine. The monopolisation of emergency causes, effects, and solutions. Ann Emerg Med 2008; 52:126 – 136. medicine in Europe: the flipside of the medal. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2017; 5 Conroy SP, Ansari K, Williams M, et al. A controlled evaluation of 23:251 – 253. comprehensive geriatric assessment in the emergency department: the 2 Wilhelms D, Sjo ¨ berg F, Chew M. Emergency medicine is about ‘Emergency Frailty Unit’. Age Ageing 2014; 43:109 – 114. collaboration: not monopolization. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2018; 35: 6 Pelling S, Kalen A, Hammar M, et al. Preparation for becoming members of 231 – 232. healthcare teams: findings from a 5-year evaluation of a student interprofessional training ward. J Interprof Care 2011; 25:328 – 332. DOI:10.1097/EJA.0000000000000756 DOI:10.1097/EJA.0000000000000755 Who takes the lead in critically ill patients? Reply to: emergency medicine is about collaboration, not monopolisation Hergen Buscher From the Department of Intensive Care Medicine, St Vincent’s Hospital, Eldar Søreide, Jannicke Mellin-Olsen, Luca Brazzi Sydney, Darlinghurst and University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia and Edoardo De Robertis From the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Stavanger Correspondence to Dr Hergen Buscher, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, University Hospital, Stavanger (ES), Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia; Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Care Medicine, Baerum Hospital, Sandvika, Norway (JM-O), Department of E-mail: hergen.buscher@svha.org.au Surgical Science, University of Turin, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, AOU Citta ` della Salute e della Scienza, Turin (LB), and Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, University of Naples ‘Federico II’, Naples, Italy (EDR) Editor, Correspondence to Edoardo De Robertis, MD, PhD, Department of 1 De Robertis et al. discussed the need for emergency Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, University of Naples ‘Federico II’, Naples, Italy medicine to exist as a separate specialty and concluded E-mail: ederober@unina.it that its benefit has not been proven. Such proof will of course never be possible since classical research tools are Editor, not applicable in such a complex issue. Nevertheless, Our Editorial was indeed intended to cause some debate emergency medicine (and intensive care medicine for on the future role of the anaesthesiologist outside the that matter) has been adopted in many countries and Eur J Anaesthesiol 2018; 35:231 – 239 Copyright © European Society of Anaesthesiology. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Anaesthesiology Wolters Kluwer Health

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Abstract

232 Correspondence A typical example is the emergency management of a operating room. We therefore appreciate the thoughtful patient’s airway. We think that it is more important that it comments from Wilhelms et al. In the Scandinavian is managed competently, than who manages it. We would and German speaking countries, care of the critically ill like to see more productive collaboration between the and injured patients, whether in the ICU, the emergen- specialties, in which initiatives such as CREM could cy department (ED) or prehospital, is still very much serve as a common platform for development rather than in the hands of anaesthesiologists. In other parts of a statement of division. We support rotations between Europe, this is different. In addition, we fully agree specialties and common educational activities, such as that most patients in the ED are noncritical with high-fidelity simulation. Rather than eschewing the op- different needs. We think that for such noncritical portunity that lies ahead, we think that the ESA, the patients both the single specialty based and the longi- European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the tudinal emergency care systems may have their European Society for Emergency Medicine should have strengths and weaknesses. It has often been stated that critical roles in this by focusing on joint initiatives that critical care is a concept, not a location. Hence, we fully will benefit to all specialities. support the notion that the European societies for anaesthesiology, emergency medicine and intensive Acknowledgements relating to this article care medicine should work together to develop strong Assistance with the letter: none. and team-based educational and clinical systems to secure optimal care for the critically ill and injured Financial support and sponsorship: none. patient. In this, we think anaesthesiologists, as vital Conflicts of interest: none. function experts, haveamajorroletoplay. References Acknowledgements relating to this article 1 De Robertis E, Bottiger BW, Soreide E, et al. The monopolisation of Assistance with the reply: none. emergency medicine in Europe: the flipside of the medal. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2017; 34:251 – 253. Financial support and sponsorship: none. 2 Gwinnutt CL. The interface between anaesthesia and emergency medicine. Emerg Med J 2001; 18:325 – 329. Conflicts of interest: none. 3 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. The role of the anaesthetist in the emergency service. London: The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland; 1991; Available at: https://www. References aagbi.org/sites/default/files/emergency91.pdf. Accessed 29 November 2017. 1 De Robertis E, Bo ¨ ttiger BW, Søreide E, et al., ESAEBA taskforce on 4 Hoot NR, Aronsky D. Systematic review of emergency department crowding: Critical Emergency Medicine. The monopolisation of emergency causes, effects, and solutions. Ann Emerg Med 2008; 52:126 – 136. medicine in Europe: the flipside of the medal. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2017; 5 Conroy SP, Ansari K, Williams M, et al. A controlled evaluation of 23:251 – 253. comprehensive geriatric assessment in the emergency department: the 2 Wilhelms D, Sjo ¨ berg F, Chew M. Emergency medicine is about ‘Emergency Frailty Unit’. Age Ageing 2014; 43:109 – 114. collaboration: not monopolization. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2018; 35: 6 Pelling S, Kalen A, Hammar M, et al. Preparation for becoming members of 231 – 232. healthcare teams: findings from a 5-year evaluation of a student interprofessional training ward. J Interprof Care 2011; 25:328 – 332. DOI:10.1097/EJA.0000000000000756 DOI:10.1097/EJA.0000000000000755 Who takes the lead in critically ill patients? Reply to: emergency medicine is about collaboration, not monopolisation Hergen Buscher From the Department of Intensive Care Medicine, St Vincent’s Hospital, Eldar Søreide, Jannicke Mellin-Olsen, Luca Brazzi Sydney, Darlinghurst and University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia and Edoardo De Robertis From the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Stavanger Correspondence to Dr Hergen Buscher, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, University Hospital, Stavanger (ES), Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia; Sydney, New South Wales, Australia Care Medicine, Baerum Hospital, Sandvika, Norway (JM-O), Department of E-mail: hergen.buscher@svha.org.au Surgical Science, University of Turin, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, AOU Citta ` della Salute e della Scienza, Turin (LB), and Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, University of Naples ‘Federico II’, Naples, Italy (EDR) Editor, Correspondence to Edoardo De Robertis, MD, PhD, Department of 1 De Robertis et al. discussed the need for emergency Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, University of Naples ‘Federico II’, Naples, Italy medicine to exist as a separate specialty and concluded E-mail: ederober@unina.it that its benefit has not been proven. Such proof will of course never be possible since classical research tools are Editor, not applicable in such a complex issue. Nevertheless, Our Editorial was indeed intended to cause some debate emergency medicine (and intensive care medicine for on the future role of the anaesthesiologist outside the that matter) has been adopted in many countries and Eur J Anaesthesiol 2018; 35:231 – 239 Copyright © European Society of Anaesthesiology. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.

Journal

European Journal of AnaesthesiologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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