Relationships Between Components of Emotional Intelligence and Suicidal Behavior in Alcohol-dependent Patients

Relationships Between Components of Emotional Intelligence and Suicidal Behavior in... Objectives:The importance of investigating various emotional skills in assessment of suicide risk in alcohol-dependent (AD) individuals has recently become the focus of increasing interest. The objective of this study was to explore the relationships between self-reported components of emotional intelligence and lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts in a clinical sample of AD subjects.Methods:A group of 80 inpatients entering an alcohol treatment program in Warsaw, Poland, was recruited. Baseline information about demographics, psychopathological symptoms, personality, and severity of alcohol problems was obtained. The Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test was utilized for assessment of emotional processing. Lifetime history of suicide attempts was obtained from the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview.Results:After accounting for affect-related suicide risk factors (severity of depression, anxiety, neuroticism), and also other significant predictors (eg, age, sex, history of childhood abuse), mood regulation/optimism deficits remained a significant correlate of lifetime suicide attempts in AD patients. In the mediation models, mood regulation appeared to fully mediate the relationship between history of suicide attempts and depression, and also neuroticism.Conclusions:The results of this study support the evidence that poor mood regulation might be related to the risk for suicidal behavior in AD individuals. These findings point towards the significance of addressing the issue of emotion-related skills in the therapy of those AD subjects who are at risk for suicide. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Addiction Medicine Wolters Kluwer Health

Relationships Between Components of Emotional Intelligence and Suicidal Behavior in Alcohol-dependent Patients

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 American Society of Addiction Medicine
ISSN
1932-0620
eISSN
1935-3227
D.O.I.
10.1097/ADM.0000000000000358
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives:The importance of investigating various emotional skills in assessment of suicide risk in alcohol-dependent (AD) individuals has recently become the focus of increasing interest. The objective of this study was to explore the relationships between self-reported components of emotional intelligence and lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts in a clinical sample of AD subjects.Methods:A group of 80 inpatients entering an alcohol treatment program in Warsaw, Poland, was recruited. Baseline information about demographics, psychopathological symptoms, personality, and severity of alcohol problems was obtained. The Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test was utilized for assessment of emotional processing. Lifetime history of suicide attempts was obtained from the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview.Results:After accounting for affect-related suicide risk factors (severity of depression, anxiety, neuroticism), and also other significant predictors (eg, age, sex, history of childhood abuse), mood regulation/optimism deficits remained a significant correlate of lifetime suicide attempts in AD patients. In the mediation models, mood regulation appeared to fully mediate the relationship between history of suicide attempts and depression, and also neuroticism.Conclusions:The results of this study support the evidence that poor mood regulation might be related to the risk for suicidal behavior in AD individuals. These findings point towards the significance of addressing the issue of emotion-related skills in the therapy of those AD subjects who are at risk for suicide.

Journal

Journal of Addiction MedicineWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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