Pulse pressure is associated with plasma amyloid-β transport dysfunction

Pulse pressure is associated with plasma amyloid-β transport dysfunction Objective:Increased pulse pressure (PP) has been implicated in the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease in middle-aged and elderly adults. Considering the close relationship between peripheral amyloid-β clearance and brain amyloid-β deposition, we investigated the potential association between PP and plasma amyloid-β transport function.Methods:In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1118 participants underwent a health assessment and quantification of plasma amyloid-β and amyloid-β transporter expression. Relationships between plasma levels of amyloid-β1–40, amyloid-β1–42, soluble low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (sLRP1), soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), and PP were determined using multiple linear regressions.Results:PP was a significant determinant of amyloid-β1–40 level (β = 0.059, P = 0.036) and log-transformed sRAGE (β = −0.002, P = 0.029) independent of age, sex, body mass index, pulse rate, mean arterial pressure, blood glucose, blood lipids, lifestyle, and medical history. Additionally, log-transformed soluble low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 and log-transformed sRAGE were positively associated with plasma amyloid-β1–40 level (β = 3.610, P < 0.001; β = 2.573, P = 0.001). Similar associations were observed between log-transformed sRAGE and plasma amyloid-β1–42 level (β = 1.350, P = 0.022).Conclusion:An elevation in PP is associated with increased plasma amyloid-β1–40 and decreased log-transformed sRAGE among individuals not taking antihypertensive medication. The underlying mechanism of this effect may be relevant to peripheral amyloid-β clearance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Hypertension Wolters Kluwer Health

Pulse pressure is associated with plasma amyloid-β transport dysfunction

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0263-6352
eISSN
1473-5598
D.O.I.
10.1097/HJH.0000000000001565
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective:Increased pulse pressure (PP) has been implicated in the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease in middle-aged and elderly adults. Considering the close relationship between peripheral amyloid-β clearance and brain amyloid-β deposition, we investigated the potential association between PP and plasma amyloid-β transport function.Methods:In this cross-sectional study, a total of 1118 participants underwent a health assessment and quantification of plasma amyloid-β and amyloid-β transporter expression. Relationships between plasma levels of amyloid-β1–40, amyloid-β1–42, soluble low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (sLRP1), soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), and PP were determined using multiple linear regressions.Results:PP was a significant determinant of amyloid-β1–40 level (β = 0.059, P = 0.036) and log-transformed sRAGE (β = −0.002, P = 0.029) independent of age, sex, body mass index, pulse rate, mean arterial pressure, blood glucose, blood lipids, lifestyle, and medical history. Additionally, log-transformed soluble low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 and log-transformed sRAGE were positively associated with plasma amyloid-β1–40 level (β = 3.610, P < 0.001; β = 2.573, P = 0.001). Similar associations were observed between log-transformed sRAGE and plasma amyloid-β1–42 level (β = 1.350, P = 0.022).Conclusion:An elevation in PP is associated with increased plasma amyloid-β1–40 and decreased log-transformed sRAGE among individuals not taking antihypertensive medication. The underlying mechanism of this effect may be relevant to peripheral amyloid-β clearance.

Journal

Journal of HypertensionWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

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