Post-Cerebrovascular Accident Unpredictable Incontinence

Post-Cerebrovascular Accident Unpredictable Incontinence Abstract Purpose This study investigates experiences of the interdisciplinary rehabilitation team in the treatment of patients with urinary incontinence after stroke. Design A qualitative approach was chosen. Ten members of an interdisciplinary treatment team were interviewed in a neurological inpatient rehabilitation setting. Methods Data were obtained via focus groups with nurses, physicians, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in a rehabilitation clinic. The analysis followed the principles of qualitative content analysis. Findings According to the interdisciplinary treatment team, professionals and patients prioritize incontinence treatment differently. Challenges surrounding collaboration, communication, structural conditions, and the perception of intervention success were identified as barriers to promoting continence. Conclusion To overcome this discrepancy in treatment priority, awareness of poststroke urinary incontinence must be improved. Clinical Relevance A key component is communication about urinary incontinence with patients and among team members. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Nursing Wolters Kluwer Health

Post-Cerebrovascular Accident Unpredictable Incontinence

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Publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.
ISSN
0278-4807
eISSN
2048-7940
D.O.I.
10.1097/rnj.0000000000000097
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Purpose This study investigates experiences of the interdisciplinary rehabilitation team in the treatment of patients with urinary incontinence after stroke. Design A qualitative approach was chosen. Ten members of an interdisciplinary treatment team were interviewed in a neurological inpatient rehabilitation setting. Methods Data were obtained via focus groups with nurses, physicians, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists in a rehabilitation clinic. The analysis followed the principles of qualitative content analysis. Findings According to the interdisciplinary treatment team, professionals and patients prioritize incontinence treatment differently. Challenges surrounding collaboration, communication, structural conditions, and the perception of intervention success were identified as barriers to promoting continence. Conclusion To overcome this discrepancy in treatment priority, awareness of poststroke urinary incontinence must be improved. Clinical Relevance A key component is communication about urinary incontinence with patients and among team members.

Journal

Rehabilitation NursingWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Apr 1, 2017

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