Occupational Hazard Exposures and Depressive Symptoms of Pregnant Workers

Occupational Hazard Exposures and Depressive Symptoms of Pregnant Workers Objectives:The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of exposure to occupational hazards and depressive mood with associated underlying risk factors among pregnant workers.Methods:Women at 12 weeks of gestation (n = 172) were recruited during regular prenatal screening. Data were obtained via questionnaires that explored job details and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.Results:The most commonly encountered hazard was prolonged standing. The majority of women reported that the workplace provided no information on the safety or rights of pregnant women, but those exposed to at least four hazards had more access to such services (P < 0.05). Thirteen percent may have suffered from depressive symptomatology. Higher-level work-related burnout, lower job control, and reduced workplace support were significantly associated with possible antenatal depressive symptoms.Conclusion:Pregnant workers are exposed to substantial levels of occupational hazards and may experience depressive symptoms; thus, their work conditions require monitoring and improvement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine Wolters Kluwer Health

Occupational Hazard Exposures and Depressive Symptoms of Pregnant Workers

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
ISSN
1076-2752
eISSN
1536-5948
D.O.I.
10.1097/JOM.0000000000001255
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives:The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of exposure to occupational hazards and depressive mood with associated underlying risk factors among pregnant workers.Methods:Women at 12 weeks of gestation (n = 172) were recruited during regular prenatal screening. Data were obtained via questionnaires that explored job details and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.Results:The most commonly encountered hazard was prolonged standing. The majority of women reported that the workplace provided no information on the safety or rights of pregnant women, but those exposed to at least four hazards had more access to such services (P < 0.05). Thirteen percent may have suffered from depressive symptomatology. Higher-level work-related burnout, lower job control, and reduced workplace support were significantly associated with possible antenatal depressive symptoms.Conclusion:Pregnant workers are exposed to substantial levels of occupational hazards and may experience depressive symptoms; thus, their work conditions require monitoring and improvement.

Journal

Journal of Occupational and Environmental MedicineWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

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