Impact of Low Muscularity and Myosteatosis on Long-term Outcome After Curative Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Propensity Score–Matched Analysis

Impact of Low Muscularity and Myosteatosis on Long-term Outcome After Curative Colorectal Cancer... BACKGROUND: Muscle loss, characterized by reduced muscle mass (myopenia), and infiltration by intermuscular and intramuscular fat (myosteatosis), predicts a poor short-term prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. However, little is known about the influence of myopenia and myosteatosis on long-term outcomes. OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to evaluate the prognostic influence of both myopenia and myosteatosis on long-term outcomes after curative colorectal cancer surgery. DESIGN: This is a retrospective analysis using a propensity score–matched analysis to reduce the possibility of selection bias. SETTINGS: The study was conducted at a single institution. PATIENTS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 211 consecutive patients with stage I to III colorectal cancer who underwent curative surgery between 2010 and 2011. INTERVENTION: CT scans were analyzed to calculate the lumbar skeletal muscle index and mean muscle attenuation using a SYNAPS VINCENT. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was cancer-specific survival. Secondary end points included overall survival and disease-free survival. RESULTS: Of 211 patients, a total of 102 and 106 were matched for myopenia and myosteatosis analyses. The median follow-up was 57.6 months. Versus the nonmyopenia group, the myopenia group manifested a significantly shorter cancer-specific survival, overall survival, and disease-free survival. Significantly shorter cancer-specific survival and overall survival times were also identified for the myosteatosis versus the nonmyosteatosis group. Before matching, multivariate analyses identified both myopenia and myosteatosis as independent prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival (p = 0.04 and p < 0.01), overall survival (p = 0.03 and p < 0.01), and disease-free survival (p < 0.01 and p < 0.01). LIMITATIONS: This study is limited by its retrospective, nonrandomized design. CONCLUSIONS: Myopenia and myosteatosis adversely affect long-term outcomes after curative colorectal cancer resection. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A463. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diseases of the Colon & Rectum Wolters Kluwer Health

Impact of Low Muscularity and Myosteatosis on Long-term Outcome After Curative Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Propensity Score–Matched Analysis

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
© The ASCRS 2018
ISSN
0012-3706
eISSN
1530-0358
D.O.I.
10.1097/DCR.0000000000000958
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Muscle loss, characterized by reduced muscle mass (myopenia), and infiltration by intermuscular and intramuscular fat (myosteatosis), predicts a poor short-term prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. However, little is known about the influence of myopenia and myosteatosis on long-term outcomes. OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to evaluate the prognostic influence of both myopenia and myosteatosis on long-term outcomes after curative colorectal cancer surgery. DESIGN: This is a retrospective analysis using a propensity score–matched analysis to reduce the possibility of selection bias. SETTINGS: The study was conducted at a single institution. PATIENTS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 211 consecutive patients with stage I to III colorectal cancer who underwent curative surgery between 2010 and 2011. INTERVENTION: CT scans were analyzed to calculate the lumbar skeletal muscle index and mean muscle attenuation using a SYNAPS VINCENT. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was cancer-specific survival. Secondary end points included overall survival and disease-free survival. RESULTS: Of 211 patients, a total of 102 and 106 were matched for myopenia and myosteatosis analyses. The median follow-up was 57.6 months. Versus the nonmyopenia group, the myopenia group manifested a significantly shorter cancer-specific survival, overall survival, and disease-free survival. Significantly shorter cancer-specific survival and overall survival times were also identified for the myosteatosis versus the nonmyosteatosis group. Before matching, multivariate analyses identified both myopenia and myosteatosis as independent prognostic factors for cancer-specific survival (p = 0.04 and p < 0.01), overall survival (p = 0.03 and p < 0.01), and disease-free survival (p < 0.01 and p < 0.01). LIMITATIONS: This study is limited by its retrospective, nonrandomized design. CONCLUSIONS: Myopenia and myosteatosis adversely affect long-term outcomes after curative colorectal cancer resection. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A463.

Journal

Diseases of the Colon & RectumWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

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