From High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol to Measurements of Function

From High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol to Measurements of Function The evidence is strong that biological functions contained in high-density lipoproteins (HDL) are antiatherogenic. These functions may track with HDL cholesterol or apolipoprotein A1 concentration to explain the strongly inverse risk curve for cardiovascular disease. Moreover, there are harmful as well as protective HDL subspecies in regard to cardiovascular disease, which could be responsible for paradoxical responses to HDL-directed treatments. Recent metabolic studies show that apolipoprotein A1–containing HDL is secreted into the circulation as mostly spherical cholesterol ester–rich lipoproteins that span the HDL size range. Most of the flux of apolipoprotein A1 HDL into and out of the circulation occurs in these spherical cholesterol-replete particles. Discoidal cholesterol-poor HDL comprises a minority of HDL secretion. We propose that much cholesterol in reverse cholesterol transport enters and exits medium and large size HDL without changing a size category, and its flux may be estimated provisionally from holoparticle clearance of cholesterol ester–rich HDL. An accurate framework for metabolism of HDL is essential to finding steady-state biomarkers that reflect HDL function in vivo. Whereas cholesterol efflux from cells to mainly discoidal HDL, mediated by ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1), predicts cardiovascular disease, cholesterol transfers to spherical HDL also can be measured and may be relevant to protection against atherosclerosis. We propose several investigative paths on which human HDL biology may be investigated leading to convenient biomarkers of HDL quality and function having potential not only to improve risk prediction but also to more accurately target drug treatments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology Wolters Kluwer Health

From High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol to Measurements of Function

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wolters_kluwer/from-high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol-to-measurements-of-function-0T1J41Sgir
Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
© 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.
ISSN
1079-5642
eISSN
1524-4636
D.O.I.
10.1161/ATVBAHA.117.307025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The evidence is strong that biological functions contained in high-density lipoproteins (HDL) are antiatherogenic. These functions may track with HDL cholesterol or apolipoprotein A1 concentration to explain the strongly inverse risk curve for cardiovascular disease. Moreover, there are harmful as well as protective HDL subspecies in regard to cardiovascular disease, which could be responsible for paradoxical responses to HDL-directed treatments. Recent metabolic studies show that apolipoprotein A1–containing HDL is secreted into the circulation as mostly spherical cholesterol ester–rich lipoproteins that span the HDL size range. Most of the flux of apolipoprotein A1 HDL into and out of the circulation occurs in these spherical cholesterol-replete particles. Discoidal cholesterol-poor HDL comprises a minority of HDL secretion. We propose that much cholesterol in reverse cholesterol transport enters and exits medium and large size HDL without changing a size category, and its flux may be estimated provisionally from holoparticle clearance of cholesterol ester–rich HDL. An accurate framework for metabolism of HDL is essential to finding steady-state biomarkers that reflect HDL function in vivo. Whereas cholesterol efflux from cells to mainly discoidal HDL, mediated by ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1), predicts cardiovascular disease, cholesterol transfers to spherical HDL also can be measured and may be relevant to protection against atherosclerosis. We propose several investigative paths on which human HDL biology may be investigated leading to convenient biomarkers of HDL quality and function having potential not only to improve risk prediction but also to more accurately target drug treatments.

Journal

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular BiologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off