Effects of propofol on wound closure and barrier function of cultured endothelial cells

Effects of propofol on wound closure and barrier function of cultured endothelial cells BACKGROUNDPropofol is widely used in routine clinical practice for the induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. Although propofol is regarded as a well tolerated anaesthetic, its effect on intact or damaged endothelial cells has not yet been elucidated.OBJECTIVEThe aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different concentrations of propofol on cell damage, metabolic activity, barrier function and wound healing capacity of human endothelial cells.DESIGNAn in vitro investigation.SETTINGResearch Laboratory of the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.MATERIALSIn vitro cultures of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs).INTERVENTIONSIntact HUVEC or wounded HUVEC monolayers were incubated with or without different concentrations of propofol (10, 30 and 100 μmol l-1).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURESCell damage, metabolic activity, monolayer permeability, wound healing capacity, protein phosphorylation.RESULTSPropofol did not alter the morphology, induce cell damage or influence metabolic activity of intact HUVEC cells. Permeability of a HUVEC monolayer was increased by propofol 100 μmol l-1 (P < 0.05). Wound closure was inhibited by the addition of propofol 30 and 100 μmol l-1 (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). This effect was associated with increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases (Erk) 1/2 (30 and 100 μmol l-1; both P < 0.05) and decreased phosphorylation of Rho kinase (Rock) (100 μmol l-1; P < 0.05).CONCLUSIONPropofol does not damage intact endothelial cells, but increases permeability of an endothelial cell monolayer at high concentrations and inhibits wound closure in vitro. Further experimental and clinical in vivo research should be performed to clarify the influence of propofol on endothelial wound healing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Anaesthesiology Wolters Kluwer Health

Effects of propofol on wound closure and barrier function of cultured endothelial cells

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 European Society of Anaesthesiology. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0265-0215
eISSN
1365-2346
D.O.I.
10.1097/EJA.0000000000000715
Publisher site
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Abstract

BACKGROUNDPropofol is widely used in routine clinical practice for the induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. Although propofol is regarded as a well tolerated anaesthetic, its effect on intact or damaged endothelial cells has not yet been elucidated.OBJECTIVEThe aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different concentrations of propofol on cell damage, metabolic activity, barrier function and wound healing capacity of human endothelial cells.DESIGNAn in vitro investigation.SETTINGResearch Laboratory of the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany.MATERIALSIn vitro cultures of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs).INTERVENTIONSIntact HUVEC or wounded HUVEC monolayers were incubated with or without different concentrations of propofol (10, 30 and 100 μmol l-1).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURESCell damage, metabolic activity, monolayer permeability, wound healing capacity, protein phosphorylation.RESULTSPropofol did not alter the morphology, induce cell damage or influence metabolic activity of intact HUVEC cells. Permeability of a HUVEC monolayer was increased by propofol 100 μmol l-1 (P < 0.05). Wound closure was inhibited by the addition of propofol 30 and 100 μmol l-1 (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). This effect was associated with increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases (Erk) 1/2 (30 and 100 μmol l-1; both P < 0.05) and decreased phosphorylation of Rho kinase (Rock) (100 μmol l-1; P < 0.05).CONCLUSIONPropofol does not damage intact endothelial cells, but increases permeability of an endothelial cell monolayer at high concentrations and inhibits wound closure in vitro. Further experimental and clinical in vivo research should be performed to clarify the influence of propofol on endothelial wound healing.

Journal

European Journal of AnaesthesiologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

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