Effect of 2 years of endurance and high-impact training on preventing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women: randomized clinical trial

Effect of 2 years of endurance and high-impact training on preventing osteoporosis in... AbstractObjective:The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of endurance and high-impact training oriented toward preventing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women with calcium and vitamin D supplementation.Methods:This study was a randomized clinical trial. Thirty-six postmenopausal women were randomized to the control and experimental groups. Thirty-four women completed the 2-year interventions. The control group training involved walking at an intense pace. The experimental group conducted high-impact training specifically oriented to prevent osteoporosis. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to estimate the T-scores of the lumbar spine and femoral neck.Results:The fast-walking group showed constant T-scores in the femoral neck and improved T-scores in the lumbar spine. High-impact exercises produced improvements in both anatomical levels. Significant differences were found in the femoral neck (ΔControl = −0.04, ΔExperimental = 0.28). The differences were not significant in the lumbar spine (ΔControl = 0.27, ΔExperimental = 0.47). Cohen's effect size (d = 0.52) suggested a medium practical significance of the trial. The power was 51%.Conclusions:Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation combined with specifically oriented exercises had a higher impact in the femoral neck than walking at an intense pace. As there were no differences at the lumbar spine level, the results were, however, inconclusive concerning which type of exercise was the most convenient. Importantly, the fact that the T-scores did not decrease after 2 years supports the belief that both proposed interventions can be conveniently used to prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. A trial with a larger sample size would provide consistency to the findings and is warranted given the possible effects and benefits. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Menopause Wolters Kluwer Health

Effect of 2 years of endurance and high-impact training on preventing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women: randomized clinical trial

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer
Copyright
© 2017 by The North American Menopause Society
ISSN
1072-3714
eISSN
1530-0374
D.O.I.
10.1097/GME.0000000000001005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractObjective:The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of endurance and high-impact training oriented toward preventing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women with calcium and vitamin D supplementation.Methods:This study was a randomized clinical trial. Thirty-six postmenopausal women were randomized to the control and experimental groups. Thirty-four women completed the 2-year interventions. The control group training involved walking at an intense pace. The experimental group conducted high-impact training specifically oriented to prevent osteoporosis. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to estimate the T-scores of the lumbar spine and femoral neck.Results:The fast-walking group showed constant T-scores in the femoral neck and improved T-scores in the lumbar spine. High-impact exercises produced improvements in both anatomical levels. Significant differences were found in the femoral neck (ΔControl = −0.04, ΔExperimental = 0.28). The differences were not significant in the lumbar spine (ΔControl = 0.27, ΔExperimental = 0.47). Cohen's effect size (d = 0.52) suggested a medium practical significance of the trial. The power was 51%.Conclusions:Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation combined with specifically oriented exercises had a higher impact in the femoral neck than walking at an intense pace. As there were no differences at the lumbar spine level, the results were, however, inconclusive concerning which type of exercise was the most convenient. Importantly, the fact that the T-scores did not decrease after 2 years supports the belief that both proposed interventions can be conveniently used to prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. A trial with a larger sample size would provide consistency to the findings and is warranted given the possible effects and benefits.

Journal

MenopauseWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

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