Depressive symptoms screening in postmenopausal women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse

Depressive symptoms screening in postmenopausal women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse AbstractObjective:This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in postmenopausal women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and to identify the factors associated with depressive symptoms in this population.Methods:We conducted a cross-sectional study involving postmenopausal women with symptomatic POP who visited the Center of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, between July 2016 and March 2017. We collected data pertaining to participants’ sociodemographic characteristics and medical histories. The participants enrolled in the study were evaluated by POP quantification (POP-Q), the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20), and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7), and the severity of their depressive symptoms was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (participants with scores ≥10 were considered “positive” for depressive symptoms, whereas participants with scores <10 were considered “negative” for depressive symptoms). We performed independent-sample t tests, Mann-Whitney U test, chi-square tests, Fisher's exact test, and logistic regression to analyze our data.Results:In all, 177 participants completed the entire study and were thus included in the analysis. Overall, 32.8% of participants were found to have depressive symptoms. We noted no differences in sociodemographic characteristics or POP-Q stage between participants with and without depressive symptoms (P > 0.05). However, depressive symptoms were associated with higher PFIQ-7 and PFDI-20 subscale scores (P < 0.001). PFIQ-7 subscale Urinary Impact Questionnaire (UIQ)-7 (odds ratio [OR] 1.038, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.010-1.066, P = 0.008), PFDI-20 subscale UDI-6 (OR 1.025, 95% CI 1.007-1.044, P = 0.008), and Colorectal-Anal Distress Inventory-8 (OR 1.025, 95% CI 1.005-1.046, P = 0.016), which represented the impact on quality of life from lower urinary tract symptoms, the distress caused by lower urinary tract symptom and bowel dysfunction, respectively, were the risk factors that were independently associated with depressive symptoms after multiple logistic regression analysis.Conclusions:Depressive symptoms were present in approximately one-third of postmenopausal women with symptomatic POP. Depressive symptoms are not associated with POP stage, but are associated with the lower urinary tract symptom and bowel dysfunction scores attributable to prolapse. Clinicians should be mindful of whether patients with symptomatic POP have depressive symptoms and should address POP and any concomitant depressive symptoms as early as possible. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Menopause Wolters Kluwer Health

Depressive symptoms screening in postmenopausal women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wolters_kluwer/depressive-symptoms-screening-in-postmenopausal-women-with-symptomatic-M2hdgusS6W
Publisher
Wolters Kluwer
Copyright
© 2017 by The North American Menopause Society
ISSN
1072-3714
eISSN
1530-0374
D.O.I.
10.1097/GME.0000000000001006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractObjective:This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in postmenopausal women with symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and to identify the factors associated with depressive symptoms in this population.Methods:We conducted a cross-sectional study involving postmenopausal women with symptomatic POP who visited the Center of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, between July 2016 and March 2017. We collected data pertaining to participants’ sociodemographic characteristics and medical histories. The participants enrolled in the study were evaluated by POP quantification (POP-Q), the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20), and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7), and the severity of their depressive symptoms was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (participants with scores ≥10 were considered “positive” for depressive symptoms, whereas participants with scores <10 were considered “negative” for depressive symptoms). We performed independent-sample t tests, Mann-Whitney U test, chi-square tests, Fisher's exact test, and logistic regression to analyze our data.Results:In all, 177 participants completed the entire study and were thus included in the analysis. Overall, 32.8% of participants were found to have depressive symptoms. We noted no differences in sociodemographic characteristics or POP-Q stage between participants with and without depressive symptoms (P > 0.05). However, depressive symptoms were associated with higher PFIQ-7 and PFDI-20 subscale scores (P < 0.001). PFIQ-7 subscale Urinary Impact Questionnaire (UIQ)-7 (odds ratio [OR] 1.038, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.010-1.066, P = 0.008), PFDI-20 subscale UDI-6 (OR 1.025, 95% CI 1.007-1.044, P = 0.008), and Colorectal-Anal Distress Inventory-8 (OR 1.025, 95% CI 1.005-1.046, P = 0.016), which represented the impact on quality of life from lower urinary tract symptoms, the distress caused by lower urinary tract symptom and bowel dysfunction, respectively, were the risk factors that were independently associated with depressive symptoms after multiple logistic regression analysis.Conclusions:Depressive symptoms were present in approximately one-third of postmenopausal women with symptomatic POP. Depressive symptoms are not associated with POP stage, but are associated with the lower urinary tract symptom and bowel dysfunction scores attributable to prolapse. Clinicians should be mindful of whether patients with symptomatic POP have depressive symptoms and should address POP and any concomitant depressive symptoms as early as possible.

Journal

MenopauseWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off