Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Gastrointestinal Malignancies Participating in Phase I Clinical Trials

Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Gastrointestinal Malignancies Participating in Phase I... Objectives:Early-phase clinical trials play a pivotal role in drug development. However, limited data are available on outcomes of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer patients enrolled in phase I clinical trials. Here, we evaluated the characteristics associated with survival in GI cancer patients participating in phase I clinical trials and attempted to validate previously established prognostic models.Materials and Methods:All consecutive patients with advanced GI tumors who participated in phase I clinical trials at our institution from January 2007 to December 2013 and received at least 1 dose of the study drug were included. Cox regression models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval.Results:In 243 study patients (median age, 62 y [range, 26 to 82 y]; 55% male), treatment included chemotherapy only (14%), targeted therapy (41%), chemotherapy+targeted therapy (42%), and others (2%) for the following disease types: pancreatic (42%), colorectal (34%), gastroesophageal (10%), hepatobiliary (13%), and others (2%). Response rate was 4%, with 38% achieving stable disease and 42% having progressive disease. Median survival was 5.8 months (range, 0.2 to 52.4 mo). Our multivariable Cox regression analyses included the following as predictors of survival: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score ≥1 (HR=1.76), prior systemic therapies ≥2 (HR=1.63), lactate dehydrogenase >618 IU/L (HR=1.85), sodium >135 mmol/L (HR=0.46), and white blood count >6×109/L (HR=1.5). Our data set was consistent with previous prognostic scores.Conclusions:This is the largest study to assess clinical outcomes in this patient population. Phase I trials provide clinical benefit to patients with advanced GI malignancies and should be recommended as a treatment option in appropriate patients. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Clinical Oncology Wolters Kluwer Health

Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Gastrointestinal Malignancies Participating in Phase I Clinical Trials

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0277-3732
eISSN
1537-453X
D.O.I.
10.1097/COC.0000000000000242
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives:Early-phase clinical trials play a pivotal role in drug development. However, limited data are available on outcomes of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer patients enrolled in phase I clinical trials. Here, we evaluated the characteristics associated with survival in GI cancer patients participating in phase I clinical trials and attempted to validate previously established prognostic models.Materials and Methods:All consecutive patients with advanced GI tumors who participated in phase I clinical trials at our institution from January 2007 to December 2013 and received at least 1 dose of the study drug were included. Cox regression models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval.Results:In 243 study patients (median age, 62 y [range, 26 to 82 y]; 55% male), treatment included chemotherapy only (14%), targeted therapy (41%), chemotherapy+targeted therapy (42%), and others (2%) for the following disease types: pancreatic (42%), colorectal (34%), gastroesophageal (10%), hepatobiliary (13%), and others (2%). Response rate was 4%, with 38% achieving stable disease and 42% having progressive disease. Median survival was 5.8 months (range, 0.2 to 52.4 mo). Our multivariable Cox regression analyses included the following as predictors of survival: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score ≥1 (HR=1.76), prior systemic therapies ≥2 (HR=1.63), lactate dehydrogenase >618 IU/L (HR=1.85), sodium >135 mmol/L (HR=0.46), and white blood count >6×109/L (HR=1.5). Our data set was consistent with previous prognostic scores.Conclusions:This is the largest study to assess clinical outcomes in this patient population. Phase I trials provide clinical benefit to patients with advanced GI malignancies and should be recommended as a treatment option in appropriate patients.

Journal

American Journal of Clinical OncologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

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