Are Lay Rescuers Adequately Prepared for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Its Aftermath?

Are Lay Rescuers Adequately Prepared for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Its Aftermath? EDITORIAL Are Lay Rescuers Adequately Prepared for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Its Aftermath? See Article by Mausz et al. Kimberly Dukes, PhD Saket Girotra, MD, SM early 40 patients experience an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) every 1,2 hour in the United States, and survival rates remain <10%. Cardiopulmonary Nresuscitation (CPR) performed by bystanders (or lay rescuers) can be a life-sav- ing intervention and is known to improve survival by >2-fold. However, the potential benefits of bystander CPR are not fully realized because rates of bystander CPR have remained <40% in the United States. Prior studies have identified several barriers in bystander response, which include fear of injuring the patient, lack of knowledge or physical inability, legal liability, and concern for transmissions of infections, among others. In a highly influential report “Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: Time to Act,” the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) emphasized fostering a culture of action through public awareness and training as a key recommendation to improve dismal rates of survival for OHCA. As a result, public health initiatives have focused on disseminating CPR training to the lay public to ensure bystanders are capable of initiating CPR in a victim of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality & Outcomes Wolters Kluwer Health

Are Lay Rescuers Adequately Prepared for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Its Aftermath?

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer
Copyright
© 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.
ISSN
1941-7705
eISSN
1941-7713
D.O.I.
10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.118.004465
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITORIAL Are Lay Rescuers Adequately Prepared for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Its Aftermath? See Article by Mausz et al. Kimberly Dukes, PhD Saket Girotra, MD, SM early 40 patients experience an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) every 1,2 hour in the United States, and survival rates remain <10%. Cardiopulmonary Nresuscitation (CPR) performed by bystanders (or lay rescuers) can be a life-sav- ing intervention and is known to improve survival by >2-fold. However, the potential benefits of bystander CPR are not fully realized because rates of bystander CPR have remained <40% in the United States. Prior studies have identified several barriers in bystander response, which include fear of injuring the patient, lack of knowledge or physical inability, legal liability, and concern for transmissions of infections, among others. In a highly influential report “Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: Time to Act,” the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) emphasized fostering a culture of action through public awareness and training as a key recommendation to improve dismal rates of survival for OHCA. As a result, public health initiatives have focused on disseminating CPR training to the lay public to ensure bystanders are capable of initiating CPR in a victim of

Journal

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality & OutcomesWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Feb 1, 2018

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