Anxiety, Depression, and Pain Symptoms: Associations With the Course of Marijuana Use and Drug Use Consequences Among Urban Primary Care Patients

Anxiety, Depression, and Pain Symptoms: Associations With the Course of Marijuana Use and Drug... Objectives:This exploratory study aims to investigate whether anxiety, depression, and pain are associated with changes in marijuana use and drug use consequences among primary care patients.Methods:In all, 331 adult primary care patients with marijuana as the only drug used were followed prospectively to investigate associations between anxiety/depression symptoms (no/minimal symptoms; anxiety or depression symptoms; symptoms of both) and pain (1–10 scale: none [0]; low [1–3]; medium [4–6]; high [7–10]) (independent variables) and substance use outcomes in regression models. These outcomes were changes (over 6 months) in primary outcomes: marijuana use days (past 30); and drug use consequences (Short Inventory of Problems—Drugs [SIP-D]); secondary outcomes—drug use risk (Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test [ASSIST] score for drugs).Results:At baseline, 67% reported no/minimal anxiety/depression symptoms, 16% anxiety or depression symptoms, 17% both; 14% reported no pain, 16% low, 23% medium, 47% high pain level. Mean (SD) number of marijuana use days was 16.4 (11.6), mean SIP-D 5.9 (9.0), mean ASSIST 12.5 (7.8); no significant association was found between anxiety/depression and marijuana use changes. Given the same baseline status for SIP-D and ASSIST, respectively, those with anxiety or depression had greater increases in SIP-D (adjusted mean difference [95% confidence interval] +3.26 [1.20; 5.32], P = 0.004) and borderline significant increases in ASSIST (+3.27 [−0.12; 6.65], P = 0.06) compared with those without anxiety or depression; those with both anxiety and depression had greater increases in ASSIST (+5.42 [2.05; 8.79], P = 0.003), but not SIP-D (+1.80 [−0.46; 4.06], P = 0.12). There was no significant association between pain and marijuana use and SIP-D changes. Given the same baseline ASSIST level, those with high pain level had greater increases in ASSIST (+4.89 [1.05; 8.72], P = 0.04) compared with those with no pain.Conclusion:In these exploratory analyses, anxiety, depression, and high pain level appear to be associated with increases in drug-related harm among primary care patients using marijuana. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Addiction Medicine Wolters Kluwer Health

Anxiety, Depression, and Pain Symptoms: Associations With the Course of Marijuana Use and Drug Use Consequences Among Urban Primary Care Patients

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wolters_kluwer/anxiety-depression-and-pain-symptoms-associations-with-the-course-of-TetH7D9g61
Publisher
Wolters Kluwer
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 American Society of Addiction Medicine
ISSN
1932-0620
eISSN
1935-3227
D.O.I.
10.1097/ADM.0000000000000362
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives:This exploratory study aims to investigate whether anxiety, depression, and pain are associated with changes in marijuana use and drug use consequences among primary care patients.Methods:In all, 331 adult primary care patients with marijuana as the only drug used were followed prospectively to investigate associations between anxiety/depression symptoms (no/minimal symptoms; anxiety or depression symptoms; symptoms of both) and pain (1–10 scale: none [0]; low [1–3]; medium [4–6]; high [7–10]) (independent variables) and substance use outcomes in regression models. These outcomes were changes (over 6 months) in primary outcomes: marijuana use days (past 30); and drug use consequences (Short Inventory of Problems—Drugs [SIP-D]); secondary outcomes—drug use risk (Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test [ASSIST] score for drugs).Results:At baseline, 67% reported no/minimal anxiety/depression symptoms, 16% anxiety or depression symptoms, 17% both; 14% reported no pain, 16% low, 23% medium, 47% high pain level. Mean (SD) number of marijuana use days was 16.4 (11.6), mean SIP-D 5.9 (9.0), mean ASSIST 12.5 (7.8); no significant association was found between anxiety/depression and marijuana use changes. Given the same baseline status for SIP-D and ASSIST, respectively, those with anxiety or depression had greater increases in SIP-D (adjusted mean difference [95% confidence interval] +3.26 [1.20; 5.32], P = 0.004) and borderline significant increases in ASSIST (+3.27 [−0.12; 6.65], P = 0.06) compared with those without anxiety or depression; those with both anxiety and depression had greater increases in ASSIST (+5.42 [2.05; 8.79], P = 0.003), but not SIP-D (+1.80 [−0.46; 4.06], P = 0.12). There was no significant association between pain and marijuana use and SIP-D changes. Given the same baseline ASSIST level, those with high pain level had greater increases in ASSIST (+4.89 [1.05; 8.72], P = 0.04) compared with those with no pain.Conclusion:In these exploratory analyses, anxiety, depression, and high pain level appear to be associated with increases in drug-related harm among primary care patients using marijuana.

Journal

Journal of Addiction MedicineWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off