An Educational Intervention Decreases Opioid Prescribing After General Surgical Operations

An Educational Intervention Decreases Opioid Prescribing After General Surgical Operations Objective:The aim of this study was to determine whether an educational intervention was sufficient to decrease opioid prescribing after general surgical operations.Summary of Background Data:We recently analyzed opioid prescription and use for 5 common outpatient operations at our institution: partial mastectomy (PM), PM with sentinel lymph node biopsy (PM SLNB), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC), laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (LIH), and open inguinal hernia repair (IH). We found that opioids were over-prescribed. We formulated guidelines for opioid prescribing that would halve the number of pills prescribed and also satisfy 80% of patients’ opioid requirements.Methods:We discussed our findings and opioid-prescribing guidelines with surgeons at our institution. We recommended that surgeons encourage patients to use a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and acetaminophen before using opioids. We then evaluated opioid prescriptions and use in 246 subsequent patients undergoing these same operations.Results:The mean number of opioid pills prescribed for each operation markedly decreased: PM 19.8 versus 5.1; PM SLNB 23.7 versus 9.6; LC 35.2 versus 19.4; LIH 33.8 versus 19.3, and IH 33.2 versus 18.3; all P < 0.0003. The total number of pills prescribed decreased by 53% when compared with the number that would have been prescribed before the educational intervention. Only 1 patient (0.4%) required a refill opioid prescription. Eighty-five percent of patients used either a NSAID or acetaminophen.Conclusions:By defining postoperative opioid requirements through patient surveys and disseminating operation-specific guidelines for opioid prescribing to surgeons, we were able to decrease the number of opioids initially prescribed by more than half. Decreased initial opioid prescriptions did not result in increased opioid refill prescriptions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Surgery Wolters Kluwer Health

An Educational Intervention Decreases Opioid Prescribing After General Surgical Operations

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0003-4932
eISSN
1528-1140
D.O.I.
10.1097/SLA.0000000000002198
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective:The aim of this study was to determine whether an educational intervention was sufficient to decrease opioid prescribing after general surgical operations.Summary of Background Data:We recently analyzed opioid prescription and use for 5 common outpatient operations at our institution: partial mastectomy (PM), PM with sentinel lymph node biopsy (PM SLNB), laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC), laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (LIH), and open inguinal hernia repair (IH). We found that opioids were over-prescribed. We formulated guidelines for opioid prescribing that would halve the number of pills prescribed and also satisfy 80% of patients’ opioid requirements.Methods:We discussed our findings and opioid-prescribing guidelines with surgeons at our institution. We recommended that surgeons encourage patients to use a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and acetaminophen before using opioids. We then evaluated opioid prescriptions and use in 246 subsequent patients undergoing these same operations.Results:The mean number of opioid pills prescribed for each operation markedly decreased: PM 19.8 versus 5.1; PM SLNB 23.7 versus 9.6; LC 35.2 versus 19.4; LIH 33.8 versus 19.3, and IH 33.2 versus 18.3; all P < 0.0003. The total number of pills prescribed decreased by 53% when compared with the number that would have been prescribed before the educational intervention. Only 1 patient (0.4%) required a refill opioid prescription. Eighty-five percent of patients used either a NSAID or acetaminophen.Conclusions:By defining postoperative opioid requirements through patient surveys and disseminating operation-specific guidelines for opioid prescribing to surgeons, we were able to decrease the number of opioids initially prescribed by more than half. Decreased initial opioid prescriptions did not result in increased opioid refill prescriptions.

Journal

Annals of SurgeryWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

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