Seven Tips to Effective Running Shoe Sizing

Seven Tips to Effective Running Shoe Sizing CLINICAL PEARLS Kevin R. Vincent, MD, PhD, FACSM, FAAPMR and Heather K. Vincent, PhD, FACSM Proper selection of a running shoe involves attention to both shoe — that will lead to a wider heel, allowing slip- style and shoe size. Choosing a shoe based on style and materials page of the heel and blister formation. The runner has overshadowed the importance of proper sizing. Improperly may compensate and tie the laces too tight which can fittedshoes canleadtoissues, such as injured toe nails, Freiberg cause compression of nerves, tendons, and blood vessels infarction, blisters, heel slippage, interdigital neuromas, bunions, on the anterior ankle. The laces should be loose enough bunionettes, and nerve compression at the ankle and medial foot. to allow a finger to slide underneath at the ankle. The resultant pain from these issues alters normal gait mechanics 5. When seeking advice, remember that a shoe that and increases susceptibility to further injuries. The following works for one person may not work for another due seven tips should be considered as part of the shoe sizing process: to differences in foot shape, landing pattern (rear or forefoot), foot intrinsic strength, or stability. 1. The shoe length should be a thumbnail width longer than 6. Remeasure foot and shoe fit each time a new shoe is the longest toe. This is usually the first or second toe. purchased. Sizing is not consistent across brands, 2. The width and shape of the shoe should match the may not be consistent across models in the same brand, shape of the foot. Take the foot bed out of the shoe and even can differ with model changes over time. and place it on the ground and stand on the foot 7. Measure the size of each foot, as some people have bed and see if the width and overall shape match. If one foot slightly larger than the other. the foot drapes over the foot bed, the shoe is too nar- row. The metatarsals will be squeezed together which These simple tips will help the runner properly fit the shoe could contribute to bunions and neuromas. and reduce the risk of irritation, pain, and injury. 3. Size the shoe later in the day when the foot is a bit larger than first thing in the morning, or size the shoe after exercise. 4. Pay attention to the shape of the heel of the shoe. If a The authors declare no conflict of interest and do not have wider forefoot is needed, do not simply get a larger any financial disclosures. Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Address for correspondence: Heather K. Vincent, PhD, UF Health Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Institute (OSMI), 3450 Hull Road, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611; E-mail: vincehk@ortho.ufl.edu. 1537-890X/1811/379 Current Sports Medicine Reports Copyright © 2019 by the American College of Sports Medicine www.acsm-csmr.org Current Sports Medicine Reports 379 Copyright © 2019 by the American College of Sports Medicine. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sports Medicine Reports Wolters Kluwer Health

Seven Tips to Effective Running Shoe Sizing

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by the American College of Sports Medicine
ISSN
1537-890X
eISSN
1537-8918
DOI
10.1249/JSR.0000000000000645
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CLINICAL PEARLS Kevin R. Vincent, MD, PhD, FACSM, FAAPMR and Heather K. Vincent, PhD, FACSM Proper selection of a running shoe involves attention to both shoe — that will lead to a wider heel, allowing slip- style and shoe size. Choosing a shoe based on style and materials page of the heel and blister formation. The runner has overshadowed the importance of proper sizing. Improperly may compensate and tie the laces too tight which can fittedshoes canleadtoissues, such as injured toe nails, Freiberg cause compression of nerves, tendons, and blood vessels infarction, blisters, heel slippage, interdigital neuromas, bunions, on the anterior ankle. The laces should be loose enough bunionettes, and nerve compression at the ankle and medial foot. to allow a finger to slide underneath at the ankle. The resultant pain from these issues alters normal gait mechanics 5. When seeking advice, remember that a shoe that and increases susceptibility to further injuries. The following works for one person may not work for another due seven tips should be considered as part of the shoe sizing process: to differences in foot shape, landing pattern (rear or forefoot), foot intrinsic strength, or stability. 1. The shoe length should be a thumbnail width longer than 6. Remeasure foot and shoe fit each time a new shoe is the longest toe. This is usually the first or second toe. purchased. Sizing is not consistent across brands, 2. The width and shape of the shoe should match the may not be consistent across models in the same brand, shape of the foot. Take the foot bed out of the shoe and even can differ with model changes over time. and place it on the ground and stand on the foot 7. Measure the size of each foot, as some people have bed and see if the width and overall shape match. If one foot slightly larger than the other. the foot drapes over the foot bed, the shoe is too nar- row. The metatarsals will be squeezed together which These simple tips will help the runner properly fit the shoe could contribute to bunions and neuromas. and reduce the risk of irritation, pain, and injury. 3. Size the shoe later in the day when the foot is a bit larger than first thing in the morning, or size the shoe after exercise. 4. Pay attention to the shape of the heel of the shoe. If a The authors declare no conflict of interest and do not have wider forefoot is needed, do not simply get a larger any financial disclosures. Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Address for correspondence: Heather K. Vincent, PhD, UF Health Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Institute (OSMI), 3450 Hull Road, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611; E-mail: vincehk@ortho.ufl.edu. 1537-890X/1811/379 Current Sports Medicine Reports Copyright © 2019 by the American College of Sports Medicine www.acsm-csmr.org Current Sports Medicine Reports 379 Copyright © 2019 by the American College of Sports Medicine. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.

Journal

Current Sports Medicine ReportsWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jan 1, 2019

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