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Radiation safety for anesthesiologists

Radiation safety for anesthesiologists Armagan Dagal Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Purpose of review Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington, To review the recent literature on the implications of occupational radiation exposure in Seattle, Washington, USA anesthesia practice. Correspondence to Armagan Dagal, MD, FRCA, Recent findings HMC 359724, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104-2499, USA Wide variation and lack of reduction in operator doses of medical radiation strongly Tel: +1 206 744 7242; e-mail: [email protected] suggests that more attention must be paid to the factors influencing radiation dose Current Opinion in Anesthesiology 2011, exposure. The eye is likely the most sensitive organ for radiation injury. Radiation-related 24:445–450 cataract formation might be a stochastic effect. Operators are strongly advised to use eye protection at all times. Safe medical radiation ophthalmic dose limits are currently under review and are likely to be lowered. Current data do not suggest a significant risk to the fetus for pregnant women working in the interventional radiology suite as long as proper monitoring and radiation safety measures are implemented. Summary Radiation is increasingly utilized in medicine for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Anesthesia providers may become exposed to unsafe doses while providing high-quality patient care. Understanding of the physical principles, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Anesthesiology Wolters Kluwer Health

Radiation safety for anesthesiologists

Current Opinion in Anesthesiology , Volume 24 (4) – Aug 1, 2011

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Copyright
Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.
ISSN
0952-7907
eISSN
1473-6500
DOI
10.1097/ACO.0b013e328347f984
pmid
21577097
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Armagan Dagal Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Purpose of review Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington, To review the recent literature on the implications of occupational radiation exposure in Seattle, Washington, USA anesthesia practice. Correspondence to Armagan Dagal, MD, FRCA, Recent findings HMC 359724, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104-2499, USA Wide variation and lack of reduction in operator doses of medical radiation strongly Tel: +1 206 744 7242; e-mail: [email protected] suggests that more attention must be paid to the factors influencing radiation dose Current Opinion in Anesthesiology 2011, exposure. The eye is likely the most sensitive organ for radiation injury. Radiation-related 24:445–450 cataract formation might be a stochastic effect. Operators are strongly advised to use eye protection at all times. Safe medical radiation ophthalmic dose limits are currently under review and are likely to be lowered. Current data do not suggest a significant risk to the fetus for pregnant women working in the interventional radiology suite as long as proper monitoring and radiation safety measures are implemented. Summary Radiation is increasingly utilized in medicine for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Anesthesia providers may become exposed to unsafe doses while providing high-quality patient care. Understanding of the physical principles,

Journal

Current Opinion in AnesthesiologyWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Aug 1, 2011

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