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Night Sweats Revisited

Night Sweats Revisited MINI REVIEW Carlos Franco-Paredes, MD, Don Mehrabi, MD, Juan C. Calle, MD, and Rafael L. Jurado, MD mic temperature control without an elevated body tem- The Circadian Rhythm of Body Temperature perature, although this has not been proven. Normal body temperature follows a diurnal pattern, peaking in mid-afternoon around 3 to 4 P.M. and Febrile Night Sweats reaching its nadir around 3 to 4 A.M. This decrease in FNSs are due to either infectious or noninfectious dis- body temperature is partially mediated by evapora- orders, which lead to elevated body temperature and tion, through the process of sweating. As an adaptive may be associated with symptoms of an indolent dis- process, an increase in the degree of sweat production ease course. The patient experiencing FNSs may be un- is necessary in most instances for an elevated temper- aware of temperatures as high as 39.4C. FNSs may be ature to reach the nocturnal nadir. This sweating reac- categorized further by cause into two major classes: in- tion has been observed to be disproportionate; most fectious and noninfectious. Although infectious causes of the sweating occurs in the first half of the night. One may already be well understood to cause elevated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice Wolters Kluwer Health

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ISSN
1056-9103
eISSN
1536-9943

Abstract

MINI REVIEW Carlos Franco-Paredes, MD, Don Mehrabi, MD, Juan C. Calle, MD, and Rafael L. Jurado, MD mic temperature control without an elevated body tem- The Circadian Rhythm of Body Temperature perature, although this has not been proven. Normal body temperature follows a diurnal pattern, peaking in mid-afternoon around 3 to 4 P.M. and Febrile Night Sweats reaching its nadir around 3 to 4 A.M. This decrease in FNSs are due to either infectious or noninfectious dis- body temperature is partially mediated by evapora- orders, which lead to elevated body temperature and tion, through the process of sweating. As an adaptive may be associated with symptoms of an indolent dis- process, an increase in the degree of sweat production ease course. The patient experiencing FNSs may be un- is necessary in most instances for an elevated temper- aware of temperatures as high as 39.4C. FNSs may be ature to reach the nocturnal nadir. This sweating reac- categorized further by cause into two major classes: in- tion has been observed to be disproportionate; most fectious and noninfectious. Although infectious causes of the sweating occurs in the first half of the night. One may already be well understood to cause elevated

Journal

Infectious Diseases in Clinical PracticeWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Jun 1, 2002

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