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Job satisfaction of nurses in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

Job satisfaction of nurses in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia Background In Ethiopia nurses have played a very important role in providing timely and quality health service in healthcare organizations. However, there is a limited literature in the area of nurses’ job satisfaction in Ethiopian public hospitals. The objective of this research is to measure job satisfaction of nurses in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital and to determine the influencing factors. Participants and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012 in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital. All full-time nurses with nonsupervisory management position and more than 1 year of work experience were invited to participate in the study. Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire was used to collect the data. Results A total of 175 copies of the questionnaires were returned out of 186 copies distributed to the respondents. The results indicated that nurses were not satisfied by their job (mean=2.21, SD=0.52). Remuneration ( r =0.71, P <0.01) and job advancement ( r =0.69, P <0.01) were statically significant and strongly correlated with nurses’ job satisfaction. Job security was associated with highest satisfaction ( r =0.41, P <0.05) Conclusion and recommendations Remuneration and job advancement were the most important factors for nurses’ job satisfaction. Hospital administrators as well as health policy makers need to address the two major identified sources of nurses’ job dissatisfaction in the study (i.e. remuneration and narrow opportunity of job advancement) and take appropriate measures to overcome their consequences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Egyptian Public Health Association Wolters Kluwer Health

Job satisfaction of nurses in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital, Ethiopia

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
Copyright
© 2016 Egyptian Public Health Association
Subject
Original articles
ISSN
0013-2446
DOI
10.1097/01.EPX.0000480719.14589.89
pmid
27110855
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background In Ethiopia nurses have played a very important role in providing timely and quality health service in healthcare organizations. However, there is a limited literature in the area of nurses’ job satisfaction in Ethiopian public hospitals. The objective of this research is to measure job satisfaction of nurses in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital and to determine the influencing factors. Participants and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012 in Jimma University Specialized Teaching Hospital. All full-time nurses with nonsupervisory management position and more than 1 year of work experience were invited to participate in the study. Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire was used to collect the data. Results A total of 175 copies of the questionnaires were returned out of 186 copies distributed to the respondents. The results indicated that nurses were not satisfied by their job (mean=2.21, SD=0.52). Remuneration ( r =0.71, P <0.01) and job advancement ( r =0.69, P <0.01) were statically significant and strongly correlated with nurses’ job satisfaction. Job security was associated with highest satisfaction ( r =0.41, P <0.05) Conclusion and recommendations Remuneration and job advancement were the most important factors for nurses’ job satisfaction. Hospital administrators as well as health policy makers need to address the two major identified sources of nurses’ job dissatisfaction in the study (i.e. remuneration and narrow opportunity of job advancement) and take appropriate measures to overcome their consequences.

Journal

Journal of the Egyptian Public Health AssociationWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Mar 1, 2016

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