Comparison of glomerular filtration rates determined using two- and single-blood sample methods with a three-blood sample technique for 2922 paediatric studies

Comparison of glomerular filtration rates determined using two- and single-blood sample methods... Objective Several different methods for measuring glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) have been developed in search of a more accurate and simplified technique. Currently, the main methods used are the slope-intercept and distribution volume techniques. In this work, 2922 GFR studies have been retrospectively reanalysed as two- and single-blood sample methods and compared with the three-blood sample data. Patients and Methods Paediatric GFR data from 1/1/1993 to 4/12/2018 using the three-blood sample technique have been reanalysed as two- and single-blood sample methods. The timing of blood sampling was also reviewed. Results Both the two- and the single-sample methods provide accurate estimates of GFR in children for all levels of renal function provided that the blood samples are collected at the appropriate times post administration of the tracer. For the highest accuracy, blood for the two-blood samples method should be collected at 2 and 4 h and at 2 h for the single-blood sample method. The relationship between renal clearance and the 2-h volume of distribution (V120) is linear with a line of best fit: GFR (ml/min) = 3.108 × V120 − 2.557. Conclusion Both the two- and the single-sample techniques can be used to measure GFR in children with the same accuracy as the three-blood sample. With the collection of only a single-blood sample, there are benefits to all involved: patients, families, and nuclear medicine personnel. In addition, institutions have a choice as to which technique to use and for which patients. Nuclear Medicine, SA Medical Imaging, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, South Australia Received 11 March 2019 Accepted 14 May 2019 Correspondence to Dr Giovanni Bibbo, Chief Medical Physicist/Radiation Safety Officer, SA Medical Imaging, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, 72 King William Road, North Adelaide 5006, South Australia, Australia, Tel: +61 8 8161 6640; fax: +61 8 8161 6969; e-mail: giovanni.bibbo@sa.gov.au http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nuclear Medicine Communications Wolters Kluwer Health

Comparison of glomerular filtration rates determined using two- and single-blood sample methods with a three-blood sample technique for 2922 paediatric studies

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Publisher
Wolters Kluwer Health
ISSN
0143-3636
eISSN
1473-5628
DOI
10.1097/MNM.0000000000001099
Publisher site
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Abstract

Objective Several different methods for measuring glomerular filtration rates (GFRs) have been developed in search of a more accurate and simplified technique. Currently, the main methods used are the slope-intercept and distribution volume techniques. In this work, 2922 GFR studies have been retrospectively reanalysed as two- and single-blood sample methods and compared with the three-blood sample data. Patients and Methods Paediatric GFR data from 1/1/1993 to 4/12/2018 using the three-blood sample technique have been reanalysed as two- and single-blood sample methods. The timing of blood sampling was also reviewed. Results Both the two- and the single-sample methods provide accurate estimates of GFR in children for all levels of renal function provided that the blood samples are collected at the appropriate times post administration of the tracer. For the highest accuracy, blood for the two-blood samples method should be collected at 2 and 4 h and at 2 h for the single-blood sample method. The relationship between renal clearance and the 2-h volume of distribution (V120) is linear with a line of best fit: GFR (ml/min) = 3.108 × V120 − 2.557. Conclusion Both the two- and the single-sample techniques can be used to measure GFR in children with the same accuracy as the three-blood sample. With the collection of only a single-blood sample, there are benefits to all involved: patients, families, and nuclear medicine personnel. In addition, institutions have a choice as to which technique to use and for which patients. Nuclear Medicine, SA Medical Imaging, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, South Australia Received 11 March 2019 Accepted 14 May 2019 Correspondence to Dr Giovanni Bibbo, Chief Medical Physicist/Radiation Safety Officer, SA Medical Imaging, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, 72 King William Road, North Adelaide 5006, South Australia, Australia, Tel: +61 8 8161 6640; fax: +61 8 8161 6969; e-mail: giovanni.bibbo@sa.gov.au

Journal

Nuclear Medicine CommunicationsWolters Kluwer Health

Published: Dec 1, 2019

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