Youth access to indoor tanning salons in urban versus rural/suburban communities

Youth access to indoor tanning salons in urban versus rural/suburban communities INTRODUCTIONSkin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, with estimated 3.5 million nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC) and 75 000 melanomas diagnosed every year. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure is a primary risk factor for both NMSC and melanoma. One common source of exposure to UV radiation is tanning devices, which is categorized as “carcinogenic to humans” (group 1) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. According to recent systematic reviews and meta‐analyses “,ever exposure” to indoor tanning is associated with a 26% to 67% higher lifetime risk for NMSC and a 20% higher lifetime risk for melanoma, with greater exposure associated with increased risk.Alarmingly, incidence rates of skin cancer have continued to rise over the past decades, especially among younger adults. Melanoma, the deadliest of all the skin cancers, is now one of the most frequently reported cancers in adolescents and young adults. Use of tanning beds has been implicated in the increasing incidence of melanoma among young adults. Nearly 32% of college‐aged white females have reported engaging in indoor tanning during the past year, with 28 sessions per year on average. Data from the 2013 national Youth Behavior Risk Surveillance System indicated that 13% of overall high http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0905-4383
eISSN
1600-0781
D.O.I.
10.1111/phpp.12364
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONSkin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, with estimated 3.5 million nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC) and 75 000 melanomas diagnosed every year. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure is a primary risk factor for both NMSC and melanoma. One common source of exposure to UV radiation is tanning devices, which is categorized as “carcinogenic to humans” (group 1) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. According to recent systematic reviews and meta‐analyses “,ever exposure” to indoor tanning is associated with a 26% to 67% higher lifetime risk for NMSC and a 20% higher lifetime risk for melanoma, with greater exposure associated with increased risk.Alarmingly, incidence rates of skin cancer have continued to rise over the past decades, especially among younger adults. Melanoma, the deadliest of all the skin cancers, is now one of the most frequently reported cancers in adolescents and young adults. Use of tanning beds has been implicated in the increasing incidence of melanoma among young adults. Nearly 32% of college‐aged white females have reported engaging in indoor tanning during the past year, with 28 sessions per year on average. Data from the 2013 national Youth Behavior Risk Surveillance System indicated that 13% of overall high

Journal

Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & PhotomedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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