Young Diabetologist and Endocrinologist Forum Trainee Award

Young Diabetologist and Endocrinologist Forum Trainee Award A13 (P228)New insights into cerebral blood flow abnormalities in brain regions responsible for cognitive function in Type 2 diabetesL HUNT1, D Selvarajah2, S Tesfaye3 and ID Wilkinson11Academic Unit of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK, 2Academic Unit of Diabetes, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK, 3Diabetes Research Unit, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UKAims: Type 2 diabetes increases the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Brain structural/anatomical changes have been associated with MCI, but cerebral blood flow (CBF) has not been fully explored. This study investigates regional CBF and examines how this relates to clinical markers of cognitive function in patients’ MCI.Methods: Seventy‐four age‐ and gender‐matched subjects [28, Type 2 diabetes + normal cognition (Type 2 diabetes); 17, Type 2 diabetes + MCI (Type 2 diabetes/MCI); and 29, healthy volunteers (HV)] were recruited. All subjects underwent clinical and questionnaire (Addenbrooke's Cognitive Assessment, ACE‐R) assessments and arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. The ASL data were modelled to yield quantitative arterial CBF maps.Results: Type 2 diabetes/MCI ACE‐R score (mean ± SD; 83 ± 4) was significantly lower compared with other groups (HV = 96 ± 2, Type 2 diabetes = 94 ± 3; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diabetic Medicine Wiley

Young Diabetologist and Endocrinologist Forum Trainee Award

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Diabetic Medicine © 2018 Diabetes UK
ISSN
0742-3071
eISSN
1464-5491
D.O.I.
10.1111/dme.2_13570
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A13 (P228)New insights into cerebral blood flow abnormalities in brain regions responsible for cognitive function in Type 2 diabetesL HUNT1, D Selvarajah2, S Tesfaye3 and ID Wilkinson11Academic Unit of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK, 2Academic Unit of Diabetes, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK, 3Diabetes Research Unit, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UKAims: Type 2 diabetes increases the risk of developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Brain structural/anatomical changes have been associated with MCI, but cerebral blood flow (CBF) has not been fully explored. This study investigates regional CBF and examines how this relates to clinical markers of cognitive function in patients’ MCI.Methods: Seventy‐four age‐ and gender‐matched subjects [28, Type 2 diabetes + normal cognition (Type 2 diabetes); 17, Type 2 diabetes + MCI (Type 2 diabetes/MCI); and 29, healthy volunteers (HV)] were recruited. All subjects underwent clinical and questionnaire (Addenbrooke's Cognitive Assessment, ACE‐R) assessments and arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. The ASL data were modelled to yield quantitative arterial CBF maps.Results: Type 2 diabetes/MCI ACE‐R score (mean ± SD; 83 ± 4) was significantly lower compared with other groups (HV = 96 ± 2, Type 2 diabetes = 94 ± 3;

Journal

Diabetic MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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