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YE ARE THE SALT OF THE EARTH

YE ARE THE SALT OF THE EARTH The difficulty of salting The first thing I want to say is how glad I am to be alive at a time when Christian preaching has rediscovered all the dimensions of the Christian message ; historical, geographical, social and political, a time when Christians feel concerned for everything that happens to men. “Nothing human is foreign to me” has now become a Christian slogan, not merely a Stoic one. In the light of the Christian hope we have. discovered afresh the fulness of the Christianity of which St. Augustine wrote in “The City of God,” when he traced the history of the Roman Empire - its decadence, the rise of the barbarians, the invasion of Africa. After several centuries during which Christians have been preoccupied with the inner life and personal salvation we are discovering afresh what is meant by “the salt of the earth.” We are discovering that the salt is made for salting, the light for illuminating, and that the Church exists for the sake of those outside itself. Let us be glad that this is happening at a time when the Church has less power and when Christians are in a minority ; this gives http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Ecumenical Review Wiley

YE ARE THE SALT OF THE EARTH

The Ecumenical Review , Volume 10 (3) – Apr 1, 1958

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 1958 World Council of Churches
ISSN
0013-0796
eISSN
1758-6623
DOI
10.1111/j.1758-6623.1958.tb01869.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The difficulty of salting The first thing I want to say is how glad I am to be alive at a time when Christian preaching has rediscovered all the dimensions of the Christian message ; historical, geographical, social and political, a time when Christians feel concerned for everything that happens to men. “Nothing human is foreign to me” has now become a Christian slogan, not merely a Stoic one. In the light of the Christian hope we have. discovered afresh the fulness of the Christianity of which St. Augustine wrote in “The City of God,” when he traced the history of the Roman Empire - its decadence, the rise of the barbarians, the invasion of Africa. After several centuries during which Christians have been preoccupied with the inner life and personal salvation we are discovering afresh what is meant by “the salt of the earth.” We are discovering that the salt is made for salting, the light for illuminating, and that the Church exists for the sake of those outside itself. Let us be glad that this is happening at a time when the Church has less power and when Christians are in a minority ; this gives

Journal

The Ecumenical ReviewWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1958

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