Workshop on Public Health Law and Ethics I & II: The Challenge of Public/Private Partnerships (PPPs)

Workshop on Public Health Law and Ethics I & II: The Challenge of Public/Private Partnerships (PPPs) identified. The focus groups revealed a need perceived by practitioners for more assistance with ethical issues, both in substance and in process. Practitioners wanted to know how to determine and balance ethical principles, as well as to whom to turn when performing ethical analysis. Ethical issues surrounding public/private partnerships (PPPs) were particularly confusing and unclear, and practitioners often asked the question, “With whom do we partner?’ Some wondered if they should actively seek PPPs when addressing the challenge of dealing with scarce resources. Given scarce resources and the opportunities that PPPs often create for more funding, the groups requested guidance in partnership and allocation decisions. .Existing public health law could not adequately answer these questions. Many public health practitioners felt that scarce resources were pushing them into PPPs without the opportunity to address or understand issues arising from the different cultures, different values, and different governance structures of potential partners in the private sphere. Some practitioners felt that the potential partners were more powerful, in a sense, than their public health organizations, and this created tension. Most were not opposed to PPPs but felt they lacked ethical. guidelines for their formation. international health in recent years, with one http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics Wiley

Workshop on Public Health Law and Ethics I & II: The Challenge of Public/Private Partnerships (PPPs)

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Abstract

identified. The focus groups revealed a need perceived by practitioners for more assistance with ethical issues, both in substance and in process. Practitioners wanted to know how to determine and balance ethical principles, as well as to whom to turn when performing ethical analysis. Ethical issues surrounding public/private partnerships (PPPs) were particularly confusing and unclear, and practitioners often asked the question, “With whom do we partner?’ Some wondered if they should actively seek PPPs when addressing the challenge of dealing with scarce resources. Given scarce resources and the opportunities that PPPs often create for more funding, the groups requested guidance in partnership and allocation decisions. .Existing public health law could not adequately answer these questions. Many public health practitioners felt that scarce resources were pushing them into PPPs without the opportunity to address or understand issues arising from the different cultures, different values, and different governance structures of potential partners in the private sphere. Some practitioners felt that the potential partners were more powerful, in a sense, than their public health organizations, and this created tension. Most were not opposed to PPPs but felt they lacked ethical. guidelines for their formation. international health in recent years, with one

Journal

The Journal of Law, Medicine & EthicsWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2003

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