Woody debris and channel morphology in first‐ and second‐order forested channels in Washington's coast ranges

Woody debris and channel morphology in first‐ and second‐order forested channels in... While there are conceptual and theoretical reasons to believe small streams behave differently than larger streams, the lack of information on small streams has lead land managers to rely on data from larger streams to guide management decisions. In response to the need for descriptive information on habitat and channel morphology specific to small, non‐fish‐bearing streams in the Pacific Northwest, morphologies and wood frequencies in 42 first‐ and second‐order forested streams <4 m wide were surveyed. Frequencies and size distributions of woody debris were compared between small streams and larger fish‐bearing streams as well as between second‐growth and virgin timber streams. Statistical models were developed to explore dominant factors affecting channel morphology and habitat. Findings suggest geomorphological relationships, specifically the role of woody debris in habitat formation, documented for larger streams do not apply to headwater streams. Relatively small wood (diameters between 10 and 40 cm), inorganic material, and organic debris (diameters <10 cm) were major step‐forming agents while big woody debris pieces (>40 cm diameter) created <10% of steps. Streams in virgin and managed stands did not differ in relative importance of very large woody debris. Because of low fluvial power, pool habitat was rare. These streams featured mostly step‐riffle morphology, not step‐pool, indicating insufficient both flow for pool‐scour. Stream power and unit stream power were dominant channel shaping factors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Woody debris and channel morphology in first‐ and second‐order forested channels in Washington's coast ranges

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/woody-debris-and-channel-morphology-in-first-and-second-order-forested-5BjRECh0o0
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
D.O.I.
10.1029/2001WR001138
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While there are conceptual and theoretical reasons to believe small streams behave differently than larger streams, the lack of information on small streams has lead land managers to rely on data from larger streams to guide management decisions. In response to the need for descriptive information on habitat and channel morphology specific to small, non‐fish‐bearing streams in the Pacific Northwest, morphologies and wood frequencies in 42 first‐ and second‐order forested streams <4 m wide were surveyed. Frequencies and size distributions of woody debris were compared between small streams and larger fish‐bearing streams as well as between second‐growth and virgin timber streams. Statistical models were developed to explore dominant factors affecting channel morphology and habitat. Findings suggest geomorphological relationships, specifically the role of woody debris in habitat formation, documented for larger streams do not apply to headwater streams. Relatively small wood (diameters between 10 and 40 cm), inorganic material, and organic debris (diameters <10 cm) were major step‐forming agents while big woody debris pieces (>40 cm diameter) created <10% of steps. Streams in virgin and managed stands did not differ in relative importance of very large woody debris. Because of low fluvial power, pool habitat was rare. These streams featured mostly step‐riffle morphology, not step‐pool, indicating insufficient both flow for pool‐scour. Stream power and unit stream power were dominant channel shaping factors.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2002

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off