Why people (don't) shop online: A lifestyle study of the internet consumer

Why people (don't) shop online: A lifestyle study of the internet consumer This study examines the lifestyle characteristics of on‐line households. By means of a U.S. national probability sample of on‐line heads of households, this descriptive research is the first of its kind to provide a lifestyle perspective of who is using the Internet to shop, who does not shop, and why. It is hypothesized and shown that, compared with on‐line nonshoppers, on‐line shoppers are younger, wealthier, better educated, have higher computer literacy, spend more time on their computer, spend more time on the Internet, find on‐line shopping to be easier and more entertaining, and are more fearful of financial loss from on‐line shopping. The study further hypothesizes that on‐line shoppers, and on‐line nonshoppers, are heterogeneous groups comprised of particular market segments having unique Internet‐related lifestyles. Four on‐line shopper segments and four on‐line nonshopper segments are identified. Each segment is profiled and its marketing implications discussed. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology & Marketing Wiley

Why people (don't) shop online: A lifestyle study of the internet consumer

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0742-6046
eISSN
1520-6793
DOI
10.1002/mar.10087
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines the lifestyle characteristics of on‐line households. By means of a U.S. national probability sample of on‐line heads of households, this descriptive research is the first of its kind to provide a lifestyle perspective of who is using the Internet to shop, who does not shop, and why. It is hypothesized and shown that, compared with on‐line nonshoppers, on‐line shoppers are younger, wealthier, better educated, have higher computer literacy, spend more time on their computer, spend more time on the Internet, find on‐line shopping to be easier and more entertaining, and are more fearful of financial loss from on‐line shopping. The study further hypothesizes that on‐line shoppers, and on‐line nonshoppers, are heterogeneous groups comprised of particular market segments having unique Internet‐related lifestyles. Four on‐line shopper segments and four on‐line nonshopper segments are identified. Each segment is profiled and its marketing implications discussed. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Journal

Psychology & MarketingWiley

Published: Jul 1, 2003

References

  • Consumer perceptions of privacy and security risks for online shopping
    Miyazaki, Miyazaki; Fernandez, Fernandez
  • Strategies for reducing consumers' risk aversion in Internet shopping
    Tan, Tan

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